Uprooted: The Japanese American Experience During World War II

Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World War II On the th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II from National Book Award finalist Albert Marr

  • Title: Uprooted: The Japanese American Experience During World War II
  • Author: Albert Marrin
  • ISBN: 9780553509373
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin Just seventy five years ago, the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it rounded up over 100,000 of its own citizens based on noOn the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin Just seventy five years ago, the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it rounded up over 100,000 of its own citizens based on nothing than their ancestry and, suspicious of their loyalty, kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years How could this have happened Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together Today, America is still filled with racial tension, and personal liberty in wartime is as relevant a topic as ever Moving and impactful, National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin s sobering exploration of this monumental injustice shines as bright a light on current events as it does on the past.

    Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World Jan , Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together. Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World Uprooted is an examination of the Japanese internment camps set up in the US during WWII Marrin looks at the racism that caused the government to set up concentration camps, as well as the racism and vitriol that led to WWII. Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World Oct , Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together. Uprooted The Japanese American Experience during World Uprooted The Japanese American Experience during World War II book Creators Albert Marrin Media Type Books Interest Level Grades , Grades Reading Level Grades Genre Young adult Theme Displacement , Evils of racism , Hazards of passing judgment , Injustice , Patriotism positive side or complications Point of View Third person overview of removal and incarceration Uprooted The Japanese Experience During WWII a must read Dec , That the book, Uprooted The Japanese American Experience During World War II, answers that question separates this work from other books geared for teen readers about the camps In Uprooted, author Albert Marrin not Japanese Internment He was uprooted at years old Feb , When Kanji Sahara remembers , he pictures throwing paper airplanes from his makeshift classroom in the Santa Anita Park grandstand. Uprooted Japanese Americans During WWII California Museum The Museum s longest running exhibit, Uprooted Japanese Americans During WWII, surveys a century of Japanese American history in California Japanese immigrants and their American born children overcame racial prejudice as they established businesses and farms, built thriving communities and contributed to the state s prosperity. Summary and reviews of Uprooted by Albert Marrin Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together. Uprooted by Albert Marrin Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together.

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      Published :2020-01-10T01:25:43+00:00

    About "Albert Marrin"

    1. Albert Marrin

      Albert Marrin is a historian and the author of than twenty nonfiction books for young people He has won various awards for his writing, including the 2005 James Madison Book Award and the 2008 National Endowment for Humanities Medal In 2011, his book Flesh and Blood So Cheap was a National Book Award Finalist Marrin is the Chairman of the History Department at New York s Yeshiva University.

    147 thoughts on “Uprooted: The Japanese American Experience During World War II”

    1. Overall, I felt that Marrin provided a lot of background to what led to the government's mistreatment of Japanese Americans and he was also very clear that it was a mistake and violated Constitutional rights. I expect this to end up on year end best lists and maybe even award lists at ALA Midwinter.However, there's one relatively small matter that annoys and angers me, especially in a book about prejudice. As Marrin explains how white gold prospectors saw California as a white paradise and clash [...]


    2. Richie’s Picks: UPROOTED: THE JAPANESE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR II by Albert Marrin, Knopf, October 2016, 256p ISBN: 978-0-553-50936-6“A prominent supporter of Donald J. Trump drew concern and condemnation from advocates for Muslims’ rights on Wednesday after he cited World War II-era Japanese-American internment camps as a ‘precedent’ for an immigrant registry suggested by a member of the president-elect’s transition team…“We’ve done it based on race, we’ve done [...]


    3. When I finished this I wanted to turn around and reread it again. I really liked author Albert Marrin's turn of phrases and found myself wanting to write them down. I read it on the elliptical machine and writing notes wasn't in my wheels - I'm not that skilled at multi-tasking. The overall message is that racism exists all over the world and that people need to learn from the past or they will repeat it. The framework of the book begins with racist views promoted by the Japanese during World Wa [...]


    4. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, war hysteria ran rampant. Unfortunately for Japanese Americans living in the United States that meant facing increasing prejudice and mistreatment. On February 29, 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt, then President of the United States, issued Executive Order 9066 calling for all necessary measures to protect the country, especially ‘military areas’. The purpose of the order was to justify moving all Japanese American people living on the mainl [...]


    5. Marrin details the history of US concentration camps for Japanese Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Focusing on racism, the author presents detailed histories of Japan, China and the US. He asks important questions like, how could this have happened, by examining the balance between liberty and security, history and law. This is a really difficult subject, well handled as a YA title, and it seems, to me, more important and relevant than ever. Words matter.


    6. So thorough and the amount of research is amazing. I particularly enjoyed the brief yet detailed and very readable history of Japan, which I didn't really know much about. Marrin has a brief chapter at the end about 9/11 and American Muslims. Would be great for middle-school and up.


    7. With gracefully page-turning prose, Uprooted explores how racism, history, and cycles of oppression led to America’s darkest moment: the internment of innocent Japanese-Americans during World War II. Through well-curated photography and intriguing sidebars, Uprooted sends an especially relevant message for these divisive times. (from my CCPL Great Books for Kids review)


    8. Uprooted is an examination of the Japanese internment camps set up in the US during WWII. Marrin looks at the racism that caused the government to set up concentration camps, as well as the racism and vitriol that led to WWII. Marrin also goes a step further, at the conclusion, showing how prejudice and racism still happen by referencing 9/11 and the issues with anti-Muslim violence happening in the US today. An excellent book for anyone wanting to learn more about this shameful era of American [...]


    9. This is an extremely light introduction to the internment. The author spends an inordinate amount of time on tangential issues -- do we really need to know the history of the Opium Wars between Britain and China to understand racial attitudes towards the Japanese in the US a hundred years later? No. No, we don't. The author spends so much time on the history of Japan that Commodore Perry doesn't even show up until a eighth of the way through the book.And in exchange for that level of background, [...]


    10. This was a very thorough and well-researched presentation of a fascinatingly disturbing period in American history - the Japanese American uprooting during WWII. The title is a little misleading - the uprooting only takes up about half the book, while the first half is a summary of Chinese and Japanese history, particularly in relation to the US. This background information does make the emotions and sentiments surrounding the uprooting easier to understand, but it was a lot to take in. I also f [...]


    11. Strengths:I've read other books about the Japanese WII Internments, and attended a fascinating presentation on the subject by someone who's parents were among the Japanese-Americans so unjustly treated. And this book added so much to what I know. There is a whole chapter at the beginning that gives an overview of Japan/China, ending with the Rape of Nanking (sorry, spelling). Throughout the book the author gives more history around the story, such as experiences of Japanese-Americans fighting in [...]


    12. This book was published in October 2016, prior to the presidential election, but I felt it quite prophetic and haunting as I read about what our white anglo-saxon protestant leaders and government did to the Japanese who where technically American (either 1st or 2nd generation) during World War II. As I read, I was simply appalled by how our government could treat it's very own citizens based on their race. What made it so haunting is that you would think that history would be a valuable lesson [...]


    13. The story of the Japanese Americans who were unfairly uprooted during the wartime hysteria in the 1940s serves as a warning to future generations that we Americans should not be carried away in blaming a whole group for the actions of a few, especially if the group in question have nothing in common with the perpetrators save for ancestry.There were plenty of blames to go around, as the myth of racial and national superiority were pervasive on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. In the early decade [...]


    14. 4.5! Relevant now more than ever, this carefully-researched account of the Japanese internment camps during WWII serves as a vivid reminder of how a nation can turn on its own citizens. For those who would suggest rounding up and registering various cultural or religious groups, reading this book will be an eye-opening experience. While much of what is recorded here may be familiar to history buffs, other aspects will not be, particularly some of the background on the conflicts between China and [...]


    15. A deeper narrative nonfiction that does yeoman's work in detailing the history of Japan through each struggle, war, conflict, cultural shift, and then into Japanese immigration to the United States and their internment after Pearl Harbor that demonstrates the divided nation (that existed before and continues to exist) related to culture and wartime politics. I appreciated the insight into the culture of the samurai, their battles with China, through all that was taken from them (over $5 billion) [...]


    16. This book is fantastic. It's very thorough and, despite some weirdly wishy-washy language in the intro, discusses racism head-on without sugarcoating a single thing. Marrin acknowledges black racism occurring alongside anti-Asian racism (obviously the book is mostly about Japanese Americans, but Marrin also gives some time to the plight of Chinese immigrants and Chinese Americans) and, in the final chapter, connects the anti-Japanese racism that led to concentration camps to modern anti-Muslim s [...]


    17. This is a tremendous book that every American should read about a very bad episode in our history . It is true that the United States was a great nation fighting for the right during World War II. But this book also exposes our country's racist attitude than visited humiliation and injustice on people of Japanese ancestry (including those who were U.S. citizens), as well as on blacks and other minorities, during the same time period. These things occurred while many of them fought and died in Am [...]


    18. This book was fascinating. The author took a lot of complicated jargon and situations and made it understandable. The book talked about a lot more than just the uprooting though too. That was actually glossed over a bit, but that's okay because there are many other books, like Farewell to Manzar, that talk about life in the camp. This book covered the history of the Japanese people and their mentality, and why they came to America in the first place. The book gave the reader a broader understand [...]


    19. True story: I was raised in a small town in rural northeast Oregon and went to a small education college, graduating in 1971. In 1980 I was living in the central coast area of California and took a class in young adult literature at Cal Poly. One of the books we read was Farewell to Manzanar by Houston. I had never heard of the Japanese internment! How can that not have been mentioned in a high school or college level history class?An excellent novel on this subject, although the setting is Brit [...]


    20. Very well written by the author, and fairly objective. The author begins by relating Japanese history. This gives the reader a better understanding of Japanese thought, behavior and tradition. The author then includes information about several instances of racism by several countries throughout history. This is what makes it so objective in my opinion. The focus is not solely on the injustice of how Japanese Americans were treated during World War 2. The author includes many interesting and impo [...]


    21. Uprooted is about Japanese internment camps during WWII. This book takes a deeper look into what life was like during this time for Japanese Americans and talked about how they were treated and the different events that occured that lead up to the mistreatment of the Japanese Americans. I really enjoyed reading this book because I never really learned much at the concentration camps we had in the US but rather just the concentration camps in Germany. I also liked that there were actual photograp [...]


    22. I was expecting to read a book regarding the Japanese American experience during World War II, an expanded version of the many personal stories written by individuals who suffered the indignity of it all. Unfortunately, Uprooted is more about racism in the United States and the world, instead of the extreme prejudice that Japanese Americans faced. Readers who are looking for information on how the concentration camps in the southern and western parts of the United States fit into the larger woul [...]


    23. This social studies informational book seemed entirely too wordy to actually be considered a young adult. It focused on Japanese Americans during WWII, but also included quite a lot of pertinent background and history relevant to Japanese Americans. It has an incredible amount of primary and secondary resources, which would make it an excellent text to use in a social studies class. But due to the length and wordiness, it may do better by splitting it up by chapter among groups to work on togeth [...]


    24. I listened to this as an audiobook. Although parts of this book were interesting, it was not quite what I was expecting or what I hoped for. A good part of the book (about a third to half) discussed the history of Japan and also, China to a lesser degree. I was hoping for a lot more people's personal experiences before, during, and after the Japanese internment. For this reason, I can't give this more than 2 stars, maybe 2.5, but good reads doesn't allow half stars to be reflected in each person [...]


    25. This book is about what happened to the Japanese in America during World War II. I must admit when I saw this book, I was worried. I dislike picking up any sort of history textbook, and this book is exactly what a textbook looks like. I was pleasantly surprised though, I knew I needed to learn more about any historical event, so I thought this would be a good place to start. As I read this book, it may not have been a complete page turner, but it was easy to read, a lot easier than I thought it [...]


    26. While informative, this book has a very cynical tone. I think it's important to present the facts without personal bias or cynicism, yet Marrin's writing style did the complete opposite. Every chapter I felt that Marrin's writing style make the tone of the book very cynical. The history of racism and bias from countries all of the world was interesting to learn but the tone ruined the information factor.


    27. There is light and dark inside each of us. There is light and dark written on the pages of history. Seeing both sides of this tragedy, meaning what was written in the history books versus what was experienced first hand, was eye opening. Could an uprooting happen again to another feared minority? The legal answer is yes. Even after committing such an atrocity, if it's considered a matter of national defense, congress left that power open


    28. With gracefully page-turning prose, Uprooted explores how racism, history, and cycles of oppression led to America’s darkest moment: the internment of innocent Japanese-Americans during World War II. Through well-curated photography and intriguing sidebars, Uprooted sends an especially relevant message for these divisive times. (Reviewer 4)


    29. "Uprooted: The Japanese American Experience" illuminates the history of both American and Japanese culture and the struggles of racism and xenophobia that come along with with war. A book for 5th grade and up, this book sets the tone for an introduction into the individuals involved and impacted from this historical event.


    30. Challenging read on the heart of racism in the United States from the experiences of the Japanese Americans during World War II. This should be a must read for every one. We as a nation need to look at laws that are put in place especially during war time that contradict the values of America.Great Read.


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