The Choice: Embrace the Possible

The Choice Embrace the Possible It s and sixteen year old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival she endures unimaginable experiences including being made to dance for the

  • Title: The Choice: Embrace the Possible
  • Author: Edith Eger
  • ISBN: The Choice
  • ISBN
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Hardcover
  • It s 1944 and sixteen year old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.The horrors of the Holocaust didn t break Edith In fact, they h It s 1944 and sixteen year old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.The horrors of the Holocaust didn t break Edith In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience The Choice is her unforgettable story Get A Copy Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleWalmart eBooksApple BooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryAlibrisIndigoBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Hardcover, 289 pages Published September 5th 2017 by Scribner More Details Original Title The Choice ISBN 1501130781 ISBN13 9781501130786 Edition Language English URL Other Editions 41 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail Edit Details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about The Choice, please sign up Popular Answered Questions Has anyone at all read this survivor memoir 1 likelike 9 months ago Add your answer Mike Yes I recommend it I wrote a short review of it Conceptually similar to Viktor Frankl s Man s Search for Meaning It s a powerful book about Yes I recommend it I wrote a short review of it Conceptually similar to Viktor Frankl s Man s Search for Meaning It s a powerful book about overcoming suffering less flag Ive studied the holocaust in depth, within my history degree, as a history teacher and as an avid reader, so Ive read a great deal on the subject I was recently referred to this book only then to be told I shouldnt read it Im now intrigued as to what is within its pages that Id find particularly distressing can anyone tell me of any triggers that are worse than what one would usually find in such a book like 6 months ago Add your answer Mirjam Some of the horrific things she writes out just as it was, without making it softer So if you easily make images to what you read, it might be not so Some of the horrific things she writes out just as it was, without making it softer So if you easily make images to what you read, it might be not so nice sometimes But that is only two or three times and if you are familiar with the subject, none of these will surprise you Perhaps only that she writes it down so state of the factly less flag See 2 questions about The Choice Lists with This Book What Women Born in the 80 s are Reading in 2018 905 books 65 voters 2018 What New Zealanders Read in 2018 115 books 7 voters More lists with this book Community Reviews Showing 1 30 4.54 Rating details 11,392 ratings 1,309 reviews All LanguagesAfrikaans 1 English 1066 Espa ol 165 Fran ais 1 Italiano 6 Magyar 6 Nederlands 33 Norsk 1 Portugu s 11 1 More filters Sort order Aug 02, 2018 Maureen rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves netgalley 4.5 STARS Please try to remember that what they believe, as well as what they do and cause you to endure does not testify to your inferiority but to their inhumanity James Baldwin, The Fire Next TimeI could never find the right words and phrases to describe what a moving yet uplifting memoir this is Edith Eger was just 16 years old in 1944 when she entered the gates of hell Auschwitz Her grandparents and mother and father were sent to the gas chamber under the direct orders of the inf 4.5 STARS Please try to remember that what they believe, as well as what they do and cause you to endure does not testify to your inferiority but to their inhumanity James Baldwin, The Fire Next TimeI could never find the right words and phrases to describe what a moving yet uplifting memoir this is Edith Eger was just 16 years old in 1944 when she entered the gates of hell Auschwitz Her grandparents and mother and father were sent to the gas chamber under the direct orders of the infamous Josef Mengele Under those same orders she was made to dance for Mengele Although she was terrified, she managed to take her mind back to the outside world, back to when she used to give ballet performances for appreciative audiences At the end of her performance for Mengele she was thrown a small loaf of bread and though grateful that she had the extra food to share with her sister Magda and others, she was also relieved that he hadn t bestowed the same fate on her as her beloved family members I won t go into any detail, but Edith shares her experiences in Auschwitz , and when liberation finally came, she was discovered among a pile of bodies barely alive.Man s inhumanity to man never fails to shock me The ones who were fortunate enough to survive the death camps, didn t just need medical intervention for their extreme malnutrition and other physical problems, but importantly it was the huge psychological scars that would prove the most difficult to heal.Edith went on to become an eminent psychologist, someone who helped people come to terms with the traumas in their lives, and she shares many of those cases with us but she also needed to exorcise the ghosts of her own past too I found when I was reading this book, that an involuntary sob would sometimes appear out of nowhere It was excruciating to read at times, and yet I couldn t put it down Desmond Tutu said that this book would leave you forever changed I m inclined to agree Thank you Edith for sharing your courageous and inspiring life story, it s not something I will forget any time soon.Thank you so Netgalley and Penguin Random House UK Ebury Publishing for my Arc I have given an honest unbiased review in exchange flag 268 likesLike see review View all 125 comments Maureen Thanks Jessi Jul 01, 2019 03 13AM Maureen Thanks Karen 2 hours, 21 min ago Aug 14, 2018 Elyse Walters rated it it was amazing review of another edition Time doesn t heal It s what you do with time Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief The above excerpt is true but that doesn t mean it s easy or can be achieved by waving a magic wand or positive thinking it alone We d only be fooling ourselves It s involved than simply stating a mantra But I m getting ahead of myself The most important thi Time doesn t heal It s what you do with time Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief The above excerpt is true but that doesn t mean it s easy or can be achieved by waving a magic wand or positive thinking it alone We d only be fooling ourselves It s involved than simply stating a mantra But I m getting ahead of myself The most important thing I can share is how extraordinary this memoiris From start to finish it s PIERCINGTONISHINGGUT WRENCHINGEYE OPENING about experiences of the Holocaust no matter how many books you ve read on this topic.Edith also gives us a very close look at what follows at the end of imprisonment, the end of the war Something will feel new about The Holocaust as if reading it for the very first time I didn t know who this 90 year old author was until yesterday but her name Edith Eva Eger is a mainstay solid name in my heart mind now Can you image writing your first and only book at age 90 If yes wonderful This woman had a story to tell I ve read several memoirs about the Holocaust written by survivors whom I can never forget their name The CHOICE , by Edith Eva Eger is a mind boggling memoir incredibly affecting I ll remember her name And I can t recommend this book highly enough When Edith was first released from the warshe said many thingsHere are a couple of things she said I AM FREE I AM FREE but now I have no voice For than a year I have not had the luxury to think about what hurts or doesn t hurt I have been able to think only about how to keep up with others, how to stay one step ahead, to get a little food here, to walk fast enough, to never stop, to stay alive, to not be left behind Now that the danger is gone, the pain within and the suffering around me turn awareness into hallucination A silent movie A march of skeletons Most of us are too physically ruined to walk We lie on carts, we lean on sticks Our uniforms are filthy and worn, so ragged and tattered that they hardly cover our skin Our skin hardly covers our bones We are an anatomy lesson Elbows, knees, ankles, cheeks, knuckles, ribs jut out like questions What are we now Our bones look obscene, our eyes are caverns, Blue black finger nails We are trauma in motion Edith was born in 1927 She died in 1978 She competed in the Olympic Games as a Hungarian swimmer in 1964 She was also training for the Olympic team for gymnastics before she was kicked off the team for being Jewish soon after her family was sent to the camps She was 17 at the time The story you ll read in this book deals with a dark, difficult, and important subject Edith brings forth a profound human quality relative to today Edith married, came over to the United States, had three children, learned English, got a degree, a PhD, taught history in Texas She later became a psychologist helping others overcome traumas flag 149 likesLike see review View all 46 comments Aug 08, 2018 Louise Wilson rated it it was amazing review of another edition Dr Edith Eva Eger is an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor helps her treat patients and allows them to escape the prisons of their own minds.Edith Eger was just sixteen when the Nazis came to her hometown of Hungry and took the Jewish family to an interment centre and then to Auschwitz Her parents were then sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Menele Edith was demanded by Menele to waltz The Blue Danube just a few hours after her parents were murdered Menele rew Dr Edith Eva Eger is an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor helps her treat patients and allows them to escape the prisons of their own minds.Edith Eger was just sixteen when the Nazis came to her hometown of Hungry and took the Jewish family to an interment centre and then to Auschwitz Her parents were then sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Menele Edith was demanded by Menele to waltz The Blue Danube just a few hours after her parents were murdered Menele rewarded Edith with a small loaf of bread of which she shared with her fellow prisoners.This is a beautifully written and very moving memoir It has been divided into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom and Healing How these people who suffered so much, could heal and then go on to make something of their lives like Edith has, beggars belief This is one very committed woman, who became a therapist, who truly understands people s pain and forgives uniquely This is not something I would normally read, but I m really glad that I did I highly recommend this book.I would like to thank NetGalley, Penguin Random House UK, Ebury Publishing and the author Edith Eger for my ARC in exchange for an honest review flag 82 likesLike see review View all 14 comments Paula Kalin Beautiful review, Louise Aug 14, 2018 12 59PM Louise Wilson Thank you, Paula Aug 14, 2018 01 01PM Oct 07, 2018 Karen rated it it was amazing This is the memoir of Dr Edith Eger, age 90an internationally acclaimed psychologist and one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors At the age of sixteen, along with her parents and sister Magda, was sent to Auschwitz.Edie and Magda survived multiple death camps, and Edie was found barely alive in a pile of corpses when American Troops liberated the camps in 1945.Such an extraordinary book on survival and stories of how she has helped others to heal by confronting their suffering and maki This is the memoir of Dr Edith Eger, age 90an internationally acclaimed psychologist and one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors At the age of sixteen, along with her parents and sister Magda, was sent to Auschwitz.Edie and Magda survived multiple death camps, and Edie was found barely alive in a pile of corpses when American Troops liberated the camps in 1945.Such an extraordinary book on survival and stories of how she has helped others to heal by confronting their suffering and making the choice to heal.It took me a long time to read this because I was going online and looking up so many places and people,not that I needed to but I was just so interested since this was a true story Dr Edith Eger is AMAZING flag 70 likesLike see review View all 27 comments Dec 12, 2018 Nicola rated it it was amazing review of another edition Just remember No one can take away from you what you ve put in your mind In a dark cattle wagon on the way to Auschwitz these are the words that 16 year old Edith s mother speaks to her Words that for the rest of her life she will continue to return to and draw strength from In 1944 in Nazi occupied Hungary,Jewish 16 year old Edith an aspiring ballerina and gymnast her sister Magda and her parents are sent to Auschwitz It is there that Edith is selected by Angel of Death Joseph Mengele Just remember No one can take away from you what you ve put in your mind In a dark cattle wagon on the way to Auschwitz these are the words that 16 year old Edith s mother speaks to her Words that for the rest of her life she will continue to return to and draw strength from In 1944 in Nazi occupied Hungary,Jewish 16 year old Edith an aspiring ballerina and gymnast her sister Magda and her parents are sent to Auschwitz It is there that Edith is selected by Angel of Death Joseph Mengele to entertain him by dancing In her mind Edith is no longer at the barracks ,but instead dancing and twirling on the stage at the Budapest Opera House to Romeo and Juliet In appreciation ,Mengele gives her a loaf of bread,which in turn she shares with the other girls An act of kindness she could never have known would save her life After moving from camp to camp,enduring brutal treatment and witnessing the must inhuman acts no one should ever have to see , Edith weighing no than 70lbs is pulled barely alive from a pile of corpses by an American GI Decades later Edith has become Dr Eger a renowned psychologist ,helping many victims of trauma, drawing on her pain and suffering ,as she holds their hands trying to find light in the darkness Dr Edith Eva Eger s story is truly remarkable Remarkable in itself that she was 90 years old when she wrote it As a reader it is very difficult to read about the atrocities Edith suffered at such a young age but throughout even her darkest times her resilience and strength shine through Throughout the book Edith often talks about choices I have learnt a very valuable lesson from Edith That it is very harmful to your well being to keep ruminating over painful experiences from the past.As Edith says Here you are In the sacred present I can t heal you or anyone but I can celebrate your choice to dismantle the prison in your mind brick by brick You can t change what happened, you can t change what you did or what was done to you But you can choose how you live NOW My precious, you can choose to be free Thank you Edith for telling your incredible story It is one I will never forget I really hope everyone gets the opportunity to read Edith s story It s not often you can say you read a book that really changed your life Highly recommend this compelling and truly inspirational memoir flag 63 likesLike see review View all 28 comments Sep 04, 2017 Kathleen rated it it was amazing Shelves netgalley 2017, read ebook, favorites, arc, nonfiction other, help thy self, memoir bio, free, read in 2017 This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch perfect memoir by Dr Edith Eger I was not familiar with Dr Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story The book is organized into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime But she is not satisfied to make this book onl This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch perfect memoir by Dr Edith Eger I was not familiar with Dr Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story The book is organized into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime But she is not satisfied to make this book only about her experience She is clearly a committed therapist who understands pain and forgiveness uniquely, and has a very powerful message that to truly live a full life, we need to make the choice not only to forgive, but to forgive ourselves.I describe the book as pitch perfect because from the introduction, Dr Eger explains that there is no heirarchy when it comes to suffering She does not tell her story so that the reader will minimize their own suffering in comparison, that would just be another way of judging ourselves As a therapist, she understands that someone whose suffering may seem superficial to others, is generally attributed to something much deeply rooted, and representative of a much larger pain I find it extraordinary that she is capable of empathizing with others to this extent When you read her story, and I hope you do, you will understand the extent of her personal suffering Not only what she endured in her youth, but as an adult coming to terms with everything she lost, and finding a way to let it be her strength, instead of imagining what her life would have been had it not been interrupted by the cruelty and injustice of the Holocaust I can not find the words to describe the depth of her compassion Life is about choices, and I am guilty of the destructive thinking that Dr Eger drescribes in the book In my Midewestern upbringing, I was raised to take responsibility for my choices I pride myself in this responsibility What this book has made me realize that often in my experience, this has been a punishing idea there are choices, and there are consequences But life is not that simple, there are choices and choices Often we choose to punish ourselves In doing so, we are imprisoning ourselves with our own beliefs of not feeling worthy, a fear of making a bad choice The author is open about choices she made in her own life, and that they may not have been the best ones Everyone suffers Everyone has endured the consequences of their own poor choices But to live our best life, we must continue to make choices, instead of allowing ourselves to be imprisoned by our past Thank you, Dr Edith Eva Eger for sharing your story and your wisdom Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advance copy of The Choice for review flag 46 likesLike see review View all 6 comments Sep 12, 2018 Paul Lockman rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves 2018 favourites, ww2 non fiction 5 starsAbsorbing Brilliant A truly inspirational read.What a woman Edith Eger is now 90 years old and has given the world this outstanding memoir of her survival in Auschwitz as a teenager and then her life after WWII when she and her husband emigrated to America and all the while describing how she has dealt with being a survivor and her path to self acceptance, self fulfilment and inner peace The book cover has a quote from Desmond Tutu, A gift to humanity One of those rare and eternal s 5 starsAbsorbing Brilliant A truly inspirational read.What a woman Edith Eger is now 90 years old and has given the world this outstanding memoir of her survival in Auschwitz as a teenager and then her life after WWII when she and her husband emigrated to America and all the while describing how she has dealt with being a survivor and her path to self acceptance, self fulfilment and inner peace The book cover has a quote from Desmond Tutu, A gift to humanity One of those rare and eternal stories that leave you forever changed It s hard to disagree with that sentiment.What makes it such a great book A few reasons for me first and foremost, it s a remarkable story of survival in itself I felt the timeframes of the book were just right with the first third of the book devoted to her time in the infamous concentration camp and the remaining two thirds devoted to the rest of her life I really liked the fact that a considerable amount was written about the few months just after the war ended and the adjustment to freedom and the brand new life Edith was facing in the late 1940s and early 1950s, which is something you don t often find with books written by holocaust survivors Also, the writing is free flowing, engaging and very high quality It s a real page turner For me, probably the main thing that makes it so memorable is that Edith went onto to become a registered clinical psychologist and she offers such raw and honest insights into the human condition, how she coped with such a traumatic experience and what gives our lives meaning I felt the balance in describing her own psyche and healing and the examples she gave of the many clients she has helped was just right too.Very early on we get some insights into Edith s firm belief about the power of the mind and our thinking and how she wants us to view her experience as a survivor Why do we so often struggle to feel alive, or distance ourselves from feeling life fully Why is it such a challenge to bring life to life If you asked me for the most common diagnosis among the people I treat, I wouldn t say depression or post traumatic stress disorder, although these conditions are all too common among those I ve known, loved, and guided to freedom No, I would say hunger We are hungry We are hungry for approval, attention, affection We are hungry for the freedom to embrace life and to really know and be ourselves.We become victims not because of what happens to us but when we choose to hold onto our victimization We develop a victim s mind a way of thinking and being that is rigid, blaming, pessimistic, stuck in the past, unforgiving, punitive, and without healthy limits or boundaries We become our own jailors when we choose the confines of the victim s mind.I also want to say there is no hierarchy of suffering There s nothing that makes my pain worse or better than yours, no graph on which we can plot the relative importance of one sorrow versus another People say to me Things in my life are pretty hard right now, but I have no right to complain it s not Auschwitz This kind of comparison can lead us to minimize or diminish our own suffering Being a survivor, being a thriver requires absolute acceptance of what was and what is I don t want you to hear my story and say, My own suffering is less significant I want you to hear my story and say, If she can do it, then so can I Edith talks us through some of the big names in psychology and psychotherapy that she gravitated towards, e.g Rogers, Ellis, Seligman, and she came up with her own version of therapy that she labelled Choice Therapy, as freedom is about choosing compassion, humour, optimism, intuition, curiosity, and self expression And to be free is to live in the present There was also a heart breaking choice that Edith had to make standing in line at Auschwitz but I won t put in a spoiler describing what that choice was.Nearing the end of the book it s 2010 and Edith has been invited to address an army unit returning from combat in Afghanistan to talk about her experience of trauma and how she coped and survived She gets a little nervous stepping up to the podium but then reminds herself I was there to share the most important truth I know, that the biggest prison is in your own mind, and in your pocket you already hold the key the willingness to take absolute responsibility for your life the willingness to risk the willingness to release yourself from judgment and reclaim your innocence, accepting and loving yourself for who you really are human, imperfect, and whole.It would be interesting to know how many holocaust survivors are still alive There can t be too many, most would be well into their 80s and 90s Edith herself is 90 and her sister Magda who was with her the whole time in Auschwitz is 95 It s so critical we get as many survivor stories published as possible while they are still alive Thank you Edith Eger for sharing your brave and compelling story with us flag 39 likesLike see review View all 15 comments Sep 11, 2018 Lisa Vegan rated it it was amazing Shelves author, zz 5star, holocaust, psychology, biography, history, non fiction, 1 also at librarything, reviewed, z2018 full 5 stars bookIt s a great mix of holocaust, biography, psychology, though it s mostly her personal story, with various family members, and to a lesser extent some of her patients included It s extremely readable and it flows beautifully, and I didn t want to put it down It s a compelling account, and it s powerful, and for me with punches to the gut emotional It seems that she wants readers others to feel empowered by her story and with what she s learned about healing and living, but m full 5 stars bookIt s a great mix of holocaust, biography, psychology, though it s mostly her personal story, with various family members, and to a lesser extent some of her patients included It s extremely readable and it flows beautifully, and I didn t want to put it down It s a compelling account, and it s powerful, and for me with punches to the gut emotional It seems that she wants readers others to feel empowered by her story and with what she s learned about healing and living, but my depressed and anxious feelings were brought up, though I definitely also saw ways to use what she teaches and models The reveal toward the end was fine for me because it was something she hadn t remembered, so it felt as though the reader was learning it when she did and didn t feel manipulative I m so glad that she wrote this book, and in this format form and with this content It s an indispensable addition to the Holocaust memoir genre, and one of the very best She does have a co writer but I never got the feeling that I wasn t directly hearing her voice.It s a very quotable book including How easily a life can become a litany of guilt and regret, a song that keeps echoing with the same chorus, with the inability to forgive ourselves How easily the life we didn t live becomes the only life we prize How easily we are seduced by the fantasy that we are in control, that we were ever in control, that the things we could or should have doneor said have the power, if only we had done or said them, to cure pain, to erase suffering, to vanish loss How easily we can cling to worship the choice we think we could or should have made and So often when we are unhappy it is becasue we are taking too much responsibility or we are taking too little Instead of being assertive and choosing clearly for ourselves, we might become aggressive choosing for others or passive letting others choose for us , or passive aggressive choosing for others by preventing them from achieving what they are choosing for themselves and Time doesn t heal It s what you do with the time Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief flag 34 likesLike see review View all 30 comments Aug 19, 2017 Samantha rated it really liked it Shelves read in 2017, giveaways arcs, biography autobiography memoir I will admit that I did not expect to enjoy this book I thought it was going to be another holocaust memoir with a hint of psychological analysis But man, was I wrong.This book was beautifully written, and was a struggle to put down every night This book was a small exercise in self help, disguised as a gorgeous memoir The Choice has genuinely made me change how I think about life I would highly recommend this book flag 34 likesLike see review View 1 comment Feb 20, 2019 Cheri rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves 2019, wwii, germany, memoir, library book, holocaust survivors, texas At the age of 16, Edith Eva Eger, Edie to her friends, was living in Kosice, Slovakia when she, along with one of her two sisters, her mother and father were forced to leave their home behind, and removed to a labor camp, followed by their transfer to Auschwitz It was the last day she would ever see her mother, and where her parents were executed Survivors don t have time to ask, Why me For survivors, the only relevant question is, What now Dr Josef Mengele has requested entertainmen At the age of 16, Edith Eva Eger, Edie to her friends, was living in Kosice, Slovakia when she, along with one of her two sisters, her mother and father were forced to leave their home behind, and removed to a labor camp, followed by their transfer to Auschwitz It was the last day she would ever see her mother, and where her parents were executed Survivors don t have time to ask, Why me For survivors, the only relevant question is, What now Dr Josef Mengele has requested entertainment by one of the new arrivals, and the girls in this group have pushed her forward knowing he is looking for someone to dance for his entertainment, the orchestra gathering outside Addressing her as little dancer, he commands, dance for me He never takes his eyes off me, but he attends to his duties as he watches I can hear his voice over the music He discusses with the other officer which ones of the hundred girls present will be killed next If I miss a step, if I do anything to displease him, it could be me I dance I dance I am dancing in hell I can t bear to see the executioner as he decides our fates I close my eyes He tosses her a loaf of bread a gesture that will save her life This is not only a memoir of her life in Auschwitz, of how she managed to survive in this literal concentration camp, but also the story of her healing after, her life after, and how she has a unique insight into helping others escape their own concentration camps, the things that hinder us, prevent us from living life to the fullest She also shares stories about patients and their challenges, and some of their breakthroughs A memoir that shows a path to self acceptance, and healing, she has shared a path toward freedom from past fears, from the anger, injustice, unresolved grief, and the freedom to enjoy the full rich feast of life Edith Eger will celebrate her 92nd this September 29th after publishing her memoir just weeks after her 90th birthday She is an amazing woman with an incredible story to share.Many thanks, once again, to the Public Library system, and the many Librarians that manage, organize and keep it running, for the loan of this book flag 35 likesLike see review View all 20 comments Oct 19, 2017 Chrissie rated it it was amazing Shelves audible, bio, germany, philo psychol, austria, favorites, religion, ww2, history, hungary This book is than a holocaust memoir Look at the title The Choice Embrace the Possible It does detail the author s holocaust experiences, but it goes further Its primary focus concerns how to live life after surviving a trauma, any trauma It is about living than it is about death The tone of the book is positive, not negative Changing the past is not possible, but actively choosing how you wish to live the future is The introduction outlines what the book will cover Edith Ege This book is than a holocaust memoir Look at the title The Choice Embrace the Possible It does detail the author s holocaust experiences, but it goes further Its primary focus concerns how to live life after surviving a trauma, any trauma It is about living than it is about death The tone of the book is positive, not negative Changing the past is not possible, but actively choosing how you wish to live the future is The introduction outlines what the book will cover Edith Eger s philosophy on how to live life, her holocaust experiences and her case work as a licensed clinical psychologist helping others The book does do what it says it will do, and it does it well It grabbed my attention from start to finish The case studies to which the author refers do not deal with the holocaust They deal with a variety of psychological problems, for example those related to anorexia, breast cancer, licentious sexual behavior, drinking problems, PTSD after the Vietnam war and loss of a mother In each case the author explains the methods she used to help each patient Each case is different and each case pulls you in and she examines what the case has taught her Being a psychologist is a learning process Being a psychologist helped her understand herself, but the process took years What is constant in all the examples is her belief that an individual must take their life in their own hands, choose and actively make choices Those who have survived the holocaust have much to teach us, particularly Edith Eger because she is a psychologist Holocaust literature does not shy away from horrible reality, but it at the same time can show how to appreciate and live the life given us This book does exactly this I love the attitude and the title is perfect.Tovah Feldshuh reads the audiobook wonderfully Edith Eger s Hungarian accent is well drawn Five stars for the narration, just as for the book flag 31 likesLike see review View all 22 comments Mar 13, 2019 Hans rated it it was amazing review of another edition Easily six stars I don t have words to describe this gem Just read it yourself flag 30 likesLike see review View all 12 comments Aug 28, 2018 Linda rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves favorites I once had the opportunity to hear Christopher Reeves speak after he was paralyzed from his neck down He was confined to a wheelchair, dependent on a ventilator to breath and yet I was totally amazed at all he had accomplished after his accidenthow he did not allow his body to imprison him Tears flowed through out the audience as he shared his story I do not think anyone could leave that day without being inspired.Amazing as it is, Edy Eger and her book have impacted me even Not onl I once had the opportunity to hear Christopher Reeves speak after he was paralyzed from his neck down He was confined to a wheelchair, dependent on a ventilator to breath and yet I was totally amazed at all he had accomplished after his accidenthow he did not allow his body to imprison him Tears flowed through out the audience as he shared his story I do not think anyone could leave that day without being inspired.Amazing as it is, Edy Eger and her book have impacted me even Not only for her own heart wrenching, horrific story of her survival as a prisoner of war at one of the worst concentration camps in history, but for her story of her life s work in teaching people how to escape the concentration camps of their own minds Some books we hold dear to our hearts for the touching stories or for how they made us feel It is the rare book that comes along that gives us new eyes to see and shares tools that can impact our daily life The Choice Embrace the Possible is that kind of book Tucked within its pages you will find hope, healing and wisdom We are blessed to have Edy Eger in our midst I am blessed to have been able to read her book I have to share this last thought No matter what I would write here, I could not do this book justice flag 23 likesLike see review View all 13 comments Aug 12, 2017 Ruth Ohagan rated it it was amazing Shelves favorites This was one of the most beautiful and inspiring books I have ever read Edith tells the story her extraordinary The main premise of the book is how she highlights her extraordinary experience as a Holocaust survivor and the how she learned to heal herself Edith gently takes the reader by the hand vividly guides the reader on a journey of her past and present through this book The most compelling section of the book is when she retells her experience in the concentration camps She explains i This was one of the most beautiful and inspiring books I have ever read Edith tells the story her extraordinary The main premise of the book is how she highlights her extraordinary experience as a Holocaust survivor and the how she learned to heal herself Edith gently takes the reader by the hand vividly guides the reader on a journey of her past and present through this book The most compelling section of the book is when she retells her experience in the concentration camps She explains it with such bravery and strength It was heartbreaking to hear what she went through The strength that she showed is otherworldly Also, compassion that she shows throughout the book is truly inspiring She doesn t just show compassion for the Nazi s but also the compassion she shows for herself I recommend this book for so many reasons It s a coming of age story and how our family can affect our self esteem and how we view ourselves Edith demonstrates that family is where we learn how to value our self worth and the personal expectations we set for ourself s Edith does explain the holocaust but that is not what the book is mainly about The book is about healing and how we can love to learn to love ourselves through our challenges Similar to Viktor Frank s, Man s search for meaning, Edith explains how love and a hunger for learning purpose helped her survive her the holocaust flag 19 likesLike see review View 1 comment Jul 27, 2017 Maria Jo o rated it it was amazing No words to describe this It s life changing and I will never forget what I read here Thank you so much for sharing your story, Dr Eger It truly was one of the most inspiring books I ve ever read flag 18 likesLike see review May 08, 2018 Laura rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves four star An uplifting and powerful lifetime memoir documenting not only the authors experience in Auschwitz but also the longer term recovery, both physically and psychologically This was an unexpected read in the sense that I anticipated much of the book to be focused on wartime when in actual fact, only the first third was The latter parts of the book focus on the authors personal life as she nurtured a family and works as a psychologist This was different to many books of a similar genre but I enj An uplifting and powerful lifetime memoir documenting not only the authors experience in Auschwitz but also the longer term recovery, both physically and psychologically This was an unexpected read in the sense that I anticipated much of the book to be focused on wartime when in actual fact, only the first third was The latter parts of the book focus on the authors personal life as she nurtured a family and works as a psychologist This was different to many books of a similar genre but I enjoyed it all the same The authors account of returning to Auschwitz as a middle aged woman are particularly moving, as is her descriptions of speeches and workshops she gave to future generations A must read for those interested in World War Two history flag 15 likesLike see review Jul 26, 2018 Tati rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves non fiction Never forget Never againYears ago, I ve had the chance of visiting a concentration camp It was a haunted place, a place that had its soul burnt in the crematories It is a dark and heavy feeling to know that someone very likely died or feared for their lives where you are casually stepping It was not a happy visit But it was a necessary visit, one I think every human being should make, so that the horror of the Holocaust is not allowed to happen again.That being said, I sometimes feel that t Never forget Never againYears ago, I ve had the chance of visiting a concentration camp It was a haunted place, a place that had its soul burnt in the crematories It is a dark and heavy feeling to know that someone very likely died or feared for their lives where you are casually stepping It was not a happy visit But it was a necessary visit, one I think every human being should make, so that the horror of the Holocaust is not allowed to happen again.That being said, I sometimes feel that the concentration camps were only a part of the horror Recovering from them must also have been a gruesome ordeal Teaching a body to eat again Trying to go back home Trying to find a familiar face from before.And Edith Eger does that beautifully She narrates the horrors of Auschwitz But she also tells of her recovery Of how she was almost raped by a Russian soldier Of overcoming and coming to grips with what had been done to her The book sort of lost its way on the last part, when she starts talking about her patients, which have nothing to do with the rest of the book They did help her overcome some of her trauma, but still, it felt a bit disconnected from the rest flag 12 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Aug 10, 2018 Gary rated it really liked it This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This is a remarkable story written by Dr Edith Eva Eger who in 1944 as a sixteen year old was sent to Auschwitz and endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele.The book tells of her bravery that helped her sister to survive and led to her bunk mates rescuing her during a death march When the camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive and survived to tell this remarkable story The book is about a lot This is a remarkable story written by Dr Edith Eva Eger who in 1944 as a sixteen year old was sent to Auschwitz and endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele.The book tells of her bravery that helped her sister to survive and led to her bunk mates rescuing her during a death march When the camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive and survived to tell this remarkable story The book is about a lot though and Edith Eger tells her life story and how her experiences in the camp encouraged her to find a hope and resilience that may appear impossible to most of us.The book is truly inspiring and tells how Edith discovered a gift to help others after the Second World War, by getting many others through their own versions of trauma This is a fascinating read of a remarkable life that is full of heart break, yet Edith succeeds in becoming a psychologist and helps others.I would like to thank Net Galley and Penguin for supplying a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review flag 13 likesLike see review View 2 comments Mar 04, 2019 Tracey Anderson rated it it was amazing review of another edition This isn t just a memoir about living through the holocaust, in fact Edith s time in the concentration camps is a very small part of the story This is a memoir about recovering and moving on Learning how to for forgive yourself for things that happened when you had no control over your life Every day we make choices for ourselves without even thinking about it and those choices can effect your life and the people around us How do we forgive ourself when those choices have such catastrophic c This isn t just a memoir about living through the holocaust, in fact Edith s time in the concentration camps is a very small part of the story This is a memoir about recovering and moving on Learning how to for forgive yourself for things that happened when you had no control over your life Every day we make choices for ourselves without even thinking about it and those choices can effect your life and the people around us How do we forgive ourself when those choices have such catastrophic consequences Do we continue living in the past and letting it destroy our present or do we make our peace with it and become the people who inspire others to be better Edith Eger is a remarkable woman who has found a way to do the latter and helps others to do so as well If I could give this book than five stars I would flag 12 likesLike see review View all 5 comments May 22, 2019 Leila rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves a bit of most subjects, a dipping into book of wisdom, autobiographies, favorites, war, my challenge books, unforgettable books, unusual books, spiritual books, non fiction This is for me, an unforgettable book which I will go back to many times It is full of such pain, honesty, truth and many emotions which are threading through the full story The terrible experiences of a Jewish girl taken prisoner by the Nazis and sent to their prison camps, especially Auschwitz is told during the first part of the book but then there is so much wisdom, humanity, love, pain and understanding throughout the second part It is not an easy book to review for there is so much This is for me, an unforgettable book which I will go back to many times It is full of such pain, honesty, truth and many emotions which are threading through the full story The terrible experiences of a Jewish girl taken prisoner by the Nazis and sent to their prison camps, especially Auschwitz is told during the first part of the book but then there is so much wisdom, humanity, love, pain and understanding throughout the second part It is not an easy book to review for there is so much It is most certainly a special book, a unique book and a book I heartily recommend to readers who like true depth in a read It took me a long time to read it and it was not a book I could read straight through There is so much to stop and ponder upon There are other reviews much better and detailed than mine Do read them for this is surely not a book to be missed flag 16 likesLike see review View all 10 comments Aug 18, 2018 Lynn rated it it was amazing Wow, double wow This is a memoir about a woman who survived Auschwitz as a child She went on to be a famous psychologist known for helping people recover from trauma There are many books about surviving the holocaust but not as many about the saga of recovery This one does both Once her story reaches adulthood she expertly weaves in patient case studies with issues relevant to her own struggles She offers many pearls of wisdom but I have a favorite there is no hierarchy of pain Everyone Wow, double wow This is a memoir about a woman who survived Auschwitz as a child She went on to be a famous psychologist known for helping people recover from trauma There are many books about surviving the holocaust but not as many about the saga of recovery This one does both Once her story reaches adulthood she expertly weaves in patient case studies with issues relevant to her own struggles She offers many pearls of wisdom but I have a favorite there is no hierarchy of pain Everyone s pain is every one s pain and there is no rating system or need for quantitative comparison Brilliant She reveals a secret near the end and I cried, not from sadness but from happiness that she overcame it flag 11 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Aug 10, 2018 Adele Shea rated it it was amazing Words can not express the feelings and emotions I felt reading The Choice.To read first hand what a POW had to endure, saddens me but I also feel privileged that Edith Eger has shared her horrific story with us.Edith Eger, is most definitely up there in the top ten strongest people I have ever learned about Such a wonderfully strong woman, she s not afraid to admit are weakness I feel, to speak of your weaknesses makes you stronger Note the last 10% of the book is just index and points of re Words can not express the feelings and emotions I felt reading The Choice.To read first hand what a POW had to endure, saddens me but I also feel privileged that Edith Eger has shared her horrific story with us.Edith Eger, is most definitely up there in the top ten strongest people I have ever learned about Such a wonderfully strong woman, she s not afraid to admit are weakness I feel, to speak of your weaknesses makes you stronger Note the last 10% of the book is just index and points of reference so it isn t as long as you think flag 10 likesLike see review Sep 03, 2018 Paul rated it really liked it review of another edition I have once again returned to the subject of the war and in turn the Holocaust It is a subject I have read a great deal about in recent time covering both fiction and nonfiction, this time, however, there is a slight twist in the narrative Edith is a Holocaust survivor and when many choose to talk about the horrific event that befell them during there time in Auschwitz this author has taken a different approach to the subject at hand She has chosen to discuss how you move on from such an eve I have once again returned to the subject of the war and in turn the Holocaust It is a subject I have read a great deal about in recent time covering both fiction and nonfiction, this time, however, there is a slight twist in the narrative Edith is a Holocaust survivor and when many choose to talk about the horrific event that befell them during there time in Auschwitz this author has taken a different approach to the subject at hand She has chosen to discuss how you move on from such an event, how you don t let it twist you up inside for the rest of your days, and in turn how you can use these very experienced to move forward and help others who have experienced very traumatic events I think it takes an exceptionally brave and strong person to talk about such matters, I could not even begin to wrap my head around these things in a very real sense Being sent to an extermination camp is something I truly believe that only a survivor can understand No matter how much we may read or see in films it is through the living of such things one truly gains a grasp of a situation It can, however, evoke strong emotions in the viewer, we are capable of feeling empathy for them without ever having been there Through this text, she does just that, and than most she goes on to show us the reader the long term effects of such situations While most books stop on liberation day Edith gives us great insight into how someone can go about rebuilding what has been shattered And as we move forward through her eyes we witness the echos stretching out across time It became and evident to me that it is not about going back to who you were before This I fear is something that is impossible to achieve It is however about how we can learn to manage our expectations and find ways to live with the events that have taken place The author presents her text in a manner and style that allowed me as the reader to gain easy accesses to the world she lives in The narrative moves between time periods showing us the acts that caused her life to shatter and then how she took them and changed them into something else How they can be used not only to help heal her but also the way in which she chose to present them to her patients and allow them to find a way to deal with the pain and sorry that is destroying their own lives It is a remarkable thing to be able to witness how someone s life can be turned around On the flip side of this she bares her own scares to the world, it is a staggering thing to see how people come to the blame themselves for choices and events that a complete out of there control In saying this woman had an incredibly hard life would be to underestimate the things she went through She did, however, manage to bring some good into the world And who can really ask for than that When we look back on our lives we find it far to easy to see the bad we have coursed This book shows that we must also bear witness to the good No one s life is complete one thing or the other, and that I feel is what we should take away from this book When I had come to the end of this book, there was so much swirling around in my head It is difficult to take everything in, in one sitting and I know I will be returning to it to get a better understanding Even if your interest in the Holocaust is only passing I feel there is a lot to be taken from this book It would I feel also be good for anyone struggling with there lives, to give a grander view of life and hope even in your darkest hour there can still be light if you are ready to fight for it flag 8 likesLike see review Jan 03, 2019 Alfred Nobile rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves survival, hollocaust, forgivness This was a book that was recommended to me And what a book it was A book of great breadth and scope A book of the triumph of the human spirit in the face of adversity and man s inhumanity to man.A triumph of the human spirit in the face of extraordinary evil A search for not revenge, which will only perpetuate the evil.A search not to change the past, which never will never change.A search that leads to being not defined by the past and a search that ultimately leads to forgiveness, not only This was a book that was recommended to me And what a book it was A book of great breadth and scope A book of the triumph of the human spirit in the face of adversity and man s inhumanity to man.A triumph of the human spirit in the face of extraordinary evil A search for not revenge, which will only perpetuate the evil.A search not to change the past, which never will never change.A search that leads to being not defined by the past and a search that ultimately leads to forgiveness, not only for the perpetrator but also the victim.Also a realisation that holding onto the past, which cannot be changed, not only does nothing for the victim but also leaves the danger of history repeating its self.This is a story of a woman who lost her childhood to the camps Her early adulthood to marrying young And much of her life, though she choose a career in which she helped others, she was initially unable to help herself and had to go on her own journey of discovery, and forgiveness.This is a book I would urge all to buy and read A book of one woman s refusal to be defined by her past and you may find yourself in there as we all have a past that can drag us down,A superb read flag 8 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Aug 10, 2018 Gary rated it really liked it review of another edition This is a remarkable story written by Dr Edith Eva Eger who in 1944 as a sixteen year old was sent to Auschwitz and endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele.The book tells of her bravery that helped her sister to survive and led to her bunk mates rescuing her during a death march When the camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive and survived to tell this remarkable story The book is about a lot This is a remarkable story written by Dr Edith Eva Eger who in 1944 as a sixteen year old was sent to Auschwitz and endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele.The book tells of her bravery that helped her sister to survive and led to her bunk mates rescuing her during a death march When the camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive and survived to tell this remarkable story The book is about a lot though and Edith Eger tells her life story and how her experiences in the camp encouraged her to find a hope and resilience that may appear impossible to most of us.The book is truly inspiring and tells how Edith discovered a gift to help others after the Second World War, by getting many others through their own versions of trauma This is a fascinating read of a remarkable life that is full of heart break, yet Edith succeeds in becoming a psychologist and helps others.I would like to thank Net Galley and Penguin for supplying a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review flag 7 likesLike see review Sep 28, 2018 Helen TBC rated it it was amazing Shelves netgalley, 5 star plus faves A truly humbling, at times heartbreaking but uplifting bookThis amazing woman, who is a survivor of Auschwitz and the most heinous crimes against humanity, has written about her childhood, her internment, and her life in Hungary and the US after the war, her struggles as an immigrant with little English, her own marital problems and her growth into a highly respected clinical psychologist who, drawing from her own experiences helped others to free themselves from the prisons created within thems A truly humbling, at times heartbreaking but uplifting bookThis amazing woman, who is a survivor of Auschwitz and the most heinous crimes against humanity, has written about her childhood, her internment, and her life in Hungary and the US after the war, her struggles as an immigrant with little English, her own marital problems and her growth into a highly respected clinical psychologist who, drawing from her own experiences helped others to free themselves from the prisons created within themselves by life s traumas, including work for the military, helping PTSD patients before the condition was widely recognised.This book contains a compelling message that we can overcome our demons, move on from hurt and anger and heartbreak and heal ourselves by looking at things in a different way.Emotional, thought provoking and truly inspirational Many thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK, Ebury Publishing for the opportunity to read this truly special book My honest thoughts and opinion are expressed in this review flag 7 likesLike see review Jan 06, 2018 Dawn rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves holocaust, 2017 reads, audiobooks, memoir, war, world war ii, non fiction, beloved, cultural jewish I finished this book last month but finally adding it on here after the holidays Profound and unbelievable Gathering my thoughts and will post review soon I will note now that this is hands down the best audio narration I ve ever listened to Actress Tovah Feldshuh was superb flag 7 likesLike see review Jul 26, 2019 Sherry rated it really liked it Excellent book flag 7 likesLike see review Apr 01, 2019 Mary rated it it was amazing review of another edition Words cannot Express how amazing this book was Dealt with concentration camps how she escaped and her life after Amaxing flag 6 likesLike see review Aug 16, 2018 Yelda Basar Moers rated it it was amazing Shelves history, 2018 reading challenge, inspiration mind body, memoir, empowerment Just remember, no one can take away from you what you ve put in your mind Right before the cattle cars open and Edith and her family are ushered through the gates of the Auschwitz death camp, Edith s mother tells her these words She is then killed soon after Everyone under 14 and over 40 is immediately killed and sent to the gas chambers Every day there is a selection process of who lives and who dies Edith is 16 and a dancer who made the Olympic team but was disqualified because she is Je Just remember, no one can take away from you what you ve put in your mind Right before the cattle cars open and Edith and her family are ushered through the gates of the Auschwitz death camp, Edith s mother tells her these words She is then killed soon after Everyone under 14 and over 40 is immediately killed and sent to the gas chambers Every day there is a selection process of who lives and who dies Edith is 16 and a dancer who made the Olympic team but was disqualified because she is Jewish After arriving at the camp, she is asked to dance for the Angel of Death Nazi officer Dr Josef Mengele and he gives her a loaf of bread for her performance She shares this with her fellow prisoners Edith goes on to survive multiple death camps and the Death March She is found by Allied soldiers with a broken back under a pile of corpses Her story of survivial is unlike anything I ve ever read because this is NOT a story of death, it s a story of hope Edith is one of the last living survivors of the holocaust.I just finished The Choice and I could not write this post fast enough to share how blown away I was by this incredible memoir that changed me I recommend that all of you read it to find out what the human spirit and mind is capable of And the power of positive thinking and a hopeful attitude in the most trying of circumstances The book has many flaws as a piece of published prose, however, don t judge the book Judge the story and judge Edith s words They are so worth reading and transformative These words from Edith are still ringing in my mind, If I survive today, tomorrow I will be free flag 6 likesLike see review previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next new topicDiscuss This Book topics posts views last activity Librari Author info fix extra author page 5 22 Jul 24, 2017 09 52PM More topics Share Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers also enjoyed

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