Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde

Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde l libro racconta la storia di un medico che facendo degli studi sulla psiche umana capisce che ogni individuo possiede una doppia natura come due personalit contrapposte una buona e una cattiva Su

  • Title: Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde
  • Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ISBN: Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • ASIN
    B00DLK1VOA
    Characters
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • l libro racconta la storia di un medico che, facendo degli studi sulla psiche umana, capisce che ogni individuo possiede una doppia natura, come due personalit contrapposte, una buona e una cattiva Sulla base di questa vicenda, l autore portato a riflettere sulla perenne lotta tra il bene e il male, allegoria del conflitto tra inconscio e ragione, pulsione e intelletto l libro racconta la storia di un medico che, facendo degli studi sulla psiche umana, capisce che ogni individuo possiede una doppia natura, come due personalit contrapposte, una buona e una cattiva Sulla base di questa vicenda, l autore portato a riflettere sulla perenne lotta tra il bene e il male, allegoria del conflitto tra inconscio e ragione, pulsione e intelletto, che attanaglia l anima umana Un romanzo del terrore, in cui si susseguono fatti inquietanti ad opera di un personaggio mostruoso, sulla cui identit rimane fino all ultimo un velo di mistero Il testo integrale del romanzo corredato di note esplicative Incontro immaginario con l autore Intervista all illustratrice Attivit ed esercizi ispirati alla metodologia Invalsi Caff letterario Get A Copy Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleWalmart eBooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Download eBook Kindle Edition, 119 pages Published June 24th 2013 by ELI Edizioni first published January 5th 1886 More Details Original Title Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde ASIN B00DLK1VOA Characters Mr Gabriel John Utterson, Dr Hastie Lanyon, Dr Henry Jekyll, Mr Edward Hyde, Richard Enfield, Poole Jekyll Hyde less setting London, England United Kingdom England United Kingdom Literary Awards Independent Publisher Book Award IPPY for Audio Fiction Abridged 1999 Other Editions 3552 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail Edit Details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde, please sign up Popular Answered Questions How scary is this book 9 likeslike 4 years ago See all 5 answers Deepanker Saxena It isn t scary It just throws light on the devil inside you and what form it can take if not controlled.The evil side of the human flag What age level is this book like 4 years ago See all 2 answers Childoftheonetrueking I would recommend 12 , the book is rather intense at points Check out my full review of this book and its content here I would recommend 12 , the book is rather intense at points Check out my full review of this book and its content here less flag See all 17 questions about Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde Lists with This Book This book is not yet featured on Listopia Add this book to your favorite list Community Reviews Showing 1 30 3.80 Rating details 328,257 ratings 10,812 reviews All LanguagesAz rbaycan dili 2 Bahasa Indonesia 58 Bahasa Melayu 1 Catal 3 Dansk 1 Deutsch 50 English 8356 Espa ol 810 Fran ais 49 Italiano 177 Latvie 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written broadly and plainly on the face of the other Evil besides which I must still believe to be the lethal side of man had left on that body an imprint of deformity and decay And yet when I looked upon that ugly idol in the glass, I was conscious of no repugnance rather of a leap of welcome This too, was myself Richard Mansfield was mostly known for his dual role depicted in this double exposure The stage adaptation opened in London in 1887, a year after the publication of the novella Picture 1895.Dr Henry Jekyll is a brilliant man who in the course of trying to understand the human psyche has turned himself, with tragic results, into a guinea pig for his experiments He has unleashed a power from within that is turning out to be too formidable to be properly contained This book was released in 1886 and at first none of the bookshop wanted to carry the book because of the subject matter, but a positive review had people flocking to the stores to read this sinister tale of hubris overcoming reason The American first edition is the true first edition because it preceded the London edition by three daysThe timing was perfect for releasing such a tale The Victorian society was struggling with the morality that had been imposed upon them by the previous generation They were embracing vice Many men of means living in London now found themselves hearing the siren song of pleasures available on the East End They could be as naughty as they wanted and safely leave their depravity on that side of town before they return to the respectable bosom of their family and careers They were struggling with the dual natures of their existences The thunder of the church and the faces of their sweet families made them feel guilty for their need to drink gin in decrepit pubs, smoke opiates in dens of inequity, consort with underage whores, and run the very real risk of being robbed by cutthroats This walk on the wild side also allowed them the privilege of feeling completely superior to all those beings providing their means of entertainment Jekyll as it turns out is no different He relishes the adventures of his other persona even as he feels the mounting horror of losing control of this other self he calls Mr Edward Hyde Further, his creation has no loyalty My two natures had memory in common, but all other faculties were most unequally shared between them Jekyll who was composite now with the most sensitive apprehensions, now with a greedy gusto, projected and shared in the pleasures and adventures of Hyde but Hyde was indifferent to Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals himself from pursuit Spencer Tracy plays Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in 1941.Unfortunately indifference becomes personal, brutal in nature, as Hyde becomes and a caged animal who does not want to have to embrace the pretenses of Jekyll s respectable position The hatred of Hyde for Jekyll was of a different order His terror of the gallows drove him continually to commit temporary suicide, and return to his subordinate station of a part instead of a person he loathed the necessity, he loathed the despondency into which Jekyll had fallen, and he resented the dislike which he was himself regarded The tincture that has so far allowed Jekyll to contain Hyde is needing to be doubled and tripled to give Jekyll some modicum of control over his deviant nature Jekyll contacts every apothecary he knows trying to find of the solution he needs only to discover that the original batch that he used to make his grand discovery with must have been tainted with a foreign substance unknown to any of the suppliers This foreign substance, unfortunately, is the ingredient that made the emergence and the restraint of Hyde possible Dire circumstances indeed Men who normally did not read novels were buying this book I believe they were looking for some insight into their own nature maybe even some sympathy for their own urges They made a book that quite possibly could have been thought of as an entertaining gothic novel into an international best seller New generations of readers are still finding this book essential reading Even those that have never read this book know the plot and certainly know the names of Jekyll and Hyde It has inspired numerous movies, mini series, comic books, and plays It could be argued that it is one of the most influential novels on the creative arts It was but a dream Robert Louis Stevenson was stymied for a new idea He was racking his brain hoping for inspiration He had his names for the agents of his dreams, his whimsical alter ego and writing self Stevenson referred to these agents, it pains me to admit, as the little people and the the Brownies His hope was that they would supply him with marketable tales RLSIt came to him in a nightmare that had him screaming loudly enough to wake the whole household It was a gift from the depths of his mind, maybe an acknowledgement of his own dark thoughts, his own darkest desires.He wrote the nightmare down on paper feverishly over ten days When he read the final draft to his wife, Fanny, her reaction was not what he expected She was cold to the tale, completely against publishing such a sensationalized piece of writing They argued, thin skinned to any criticism as most writers are especially when it is a complete repudiation of a piece of writing he was particularly proud of Stevenson, in a moment of rage, tossed the whole manuscript in the fireplace Be still my heart There is no arguing with success of this magnitude, but I can t help but wonder what was in that first draft If there is a criticism of this novel it would be for the restrained nature in which it is presented Did Stevenson just let it all go Did he give us elaborate details of Hyde s excursions Was Jekyll s glee in Hyde s adventures fully explored I understand Stevenson was a fiery Scot given to flights of temper that could only be doused with something as dramatic as throwing 60,000 words into the fire, but how about flinging the pages about the room, and storming away followed by the proper slamming of a door to punctuate displeasure In my mind s eye I can see his stepson, Lloyd Osborne, carefully gathering the pages, scaring himself reading them in the middle of the night, and keeping them for all posterity between the leaves of a writing journal In 1920 John Barry played Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.Stevenson was obsessed with the concept of good and evil We all have a side to our personality that we prefer to keep hidden We all wear masks For now our inner thoughts are still our own, but don t be surprised if the NSA has figured out how to tap in and tape those as well Sometimes wearing the mask becomes arduous Another entity fights to be allowed to roam free We want to be impulsive, self gratifying, slutty, sometimes brutal, but most importantly unfettered by our reputations I wouldn t necessarily call that evil, but there are people who do have true viciousness barely contained and we have to hope they continue to restrain it The Victorians identified with Jekyll Hyde and maybe to know that others are also struggling with doing right without doing wrong certainly made them feel less like an aberration when they next felt the itch for the East End I m sure this book was the source of many fine conversations as they drank their gin and smelled the musky hair of the doxie on their laps The author with his wife and their household in Vailima, Samoa, c 1892 Photograph of Robert Louis Stevenson and family, Vailima, on the island of Upolu in Samoa Left to right Mary Carter, maid to Stevenson s mother, Lloyd Osbourne, Stevenson s stepson, Margaret Balfour, Stevenson s mother, Isobel Strong, Stevenson s stepdaughter, Robert Louis Stevenson, Austin Strong, the Strong s son, Stevenson s wife Fanny Stevenson, and Joseph Dwight Strong, Isobel s husband.The word that most of his friends and acquaintances used to describe Stevenson RLS as I often think of him was captivating He was sorely missed when he made the decision to move to Samoa taking himself a long way from supportive friends and his fans He was searching for a healthy environment that would restore his always ailing health Unfortunately the new climate was found too late, he died at the age of 44 from a brain aneurysm leaving his last novel, the Weir of Hermiston, unfinished Many believe that he was on the verge of writing his greatest novel Oddly enough, F Scott Fitzgerald a very different writer from RLS, but also a favorite of mine died at 44 as well Critics also believe that The Last Tycoon would have been his best novel if he d had time to finish it It does make me wonder about the wonderful stories that were left forever trapped in the now long silent pens of RLS and FSF, but they both left lasting monuments to literature Even those that don t appreciate their writing the way I do still have to admit that their impact was undeniable If you wish to see of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit also have a Facebook blogger page at flag 457 likesLike see review View all 74 comments Oct 28, 2014 Ariel rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves favourites OH BOY, OH BOY, PEOPLE I HAVE A NEW FAVOURITE This edition came with two stories, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and The Bottle Imp, and they were both awesome let s talk about them I m so excited I can t contain myself.Jekyll So Well Crafted From beginning to end the story was engaging and the themes where quite straightforward, but I really love that in writing see George Orwell is my favourite author I like it when authors aren t bogging their messages down in unnee OH BOY, OH BOY, PEOPLE I HAVE A NEW FAVOURITE This edition came with two stories, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and The Bottle Imp, and they were both awesome let s talk about them I m so excited I can t contain myself.Jekyll So Well Crafted From beginning to end the story was engaging and the themes where quite straightforward, but I really love that in writing see George Orwell is my favourite author I like it when authors aren t bogging their messages down in unneeded subtleties Some of these sentences, I swear to god One of my favourite ones I slept after the prostration of the day, with a stringent and profound slumber which not even the nightmares that wrung me could avail to break The context doesn t even matter It s solid gold My only distress with this story comes not from anything Stevenson did, but from the fact that it s so famous spoiler alert I wish I didn t know Jekyll and Hyde are the same person Gosh darn it The story is solid enough that it doesn t matter if you know or not, which is important if one spoiler can ruin your story you don t have a very good story , but it would have been so wickedly fun not to know Stevenson did such a good job of hiding it The ideas of evil vs good in humans were great And the idea that Jekyll didn t hate Hyde GOSH DARNIT THIS WAS GREAT That ending though That ending THAT ENDING, JESUS.Bottle I had no idea what the heck this was, which made it so much fun What a story Stevenson has an awesome imagination To avoid spoilers I ll keep this brief This story was so stressful Oh man I felt legitimate anxiety My heart, it was not happy WHICH IS GREAT It s amazing when a piece of writing can make you feel real dread Why was it set in Hawaii When talking to a friend who is Scottish and so is Stevenson so I trust her on this subject she explained to me that Stevenson was known for being a world traveller, so maybe he just wanted to explore something new It was interesting, I d like to look into the significance of the Hawaii setting definitely something to do with being an island I wanted this to end sadly Gosh it was so set up for a sad ending, and I was dreading dreading dreading that it would end badly but sometimes these things can t end well I think, ultimately, the ending didn t feel too bad It could have been done worse, I think the saviour situation that happened had legitimate merit, but still I think this would have been better if it had ended horribly.Go read this, seriously people flag 303 likesLike see review View all 20 comments May 17, 2009 Anne rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves jeff is an ass, buddy read, classics, read in 2015 Pfft.This Stevenson guy totally ripped off Stan Lee s Hulk character I mean, did this dude seriously think he could get away with what basically boils down to a copy paste job of one of the most iconic literary characters in comics I Think Not.Stan, my friend, you have a real chance at winning a copyright infringement lawsuit view spoiler For the love of all that s good and holy, please don t correct me in the comments Hello Joking It s obvious that Mr Stevenson s real inspira Pfft.This Stevenson guy totally ripped off Stan Lee s Hulk character I mean, did this dude seriously think he could get away with what basically boils down to a copy paste job of one of the most iconic literary characters in comics I Think Not.Stan, my friend, you have a real chance at winning a copyright infringement lawsuit view spoiler For the love of all that s good and holy, please don t correct me in the comments Hello Joking It s obvious that Mr Stevenson s real inspiration for this short story came from the Bugs Bunny cartoons Duh. hide spoiler Edit 2017For those of you without a working sense of humor, please click this spoiler tag before commenting on my review view spoiler The statements above were written with the help ofI m pointing this out because several of people have had serious keyboard related injuries after angry typing to let me know that GASP Stan Lee was born well after Robert Louis Stevenson sighYes I knew that Thank you for your concern I was joking I assumed it was such an asinine statement that no one could mistake it for anything but a joke I was wrong hide spoiler Dr Jekyll, you dirty, dirty little man Yes, yes, yes I know that the whole story is supposed to be some deep philosophical look at the duality of human nature But that s not interesting.Well, it s not interesting to me.As supposedly groundbreaking as this discussion was at the time this sucker was written I know this cause the introduction said so , it s nothing new to me Hey, I read stuff, so I ve been introduced to the idea.No, what kept me going was trying to figure out what the hell kind of kink this mild mannered old fart was into Seriously He developed a freaking magic serum just so he could run around and do WHAT What was so off the charts freaky that he d need to transform into a different person to get away with it I have my theoriesBut, unfortunately, Stevenson never gives us a straight answer He just decided to skip over the juicy bits and ratchet up the tension with the with the whole Good vs Evil thing.Eh.I guess he did a pretty decent job of pulling it off But what really struck a chord with me was the nice ABC After School Special feel to this one In the end, Dr Jekyll apologizes, and everyone goes home happy Moral of the Story Don t drink anything that has green smoke coming off of it Especially if it was brewed in a mad scientist s basement.You will inevitably shrink and get hairy knuckles.Buddy read with The Jeff, Delee, Dustin, Stepheny, Holly, and party crasher Tadiana flag 259 likesLike see review View all 439 comments Sep 09, 2018 Elise TheBookishActress rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves marked as class reading, books released 1900setc, genre literary nonfic, books read 2018, 4 star 55 pages later and I m still convinced that Robert Louis Stevenson named his characters this way exclusively so he could fit in the line if he shall be Mr Hyde, I shall be Mr Seek and honestly that s iconic Quiet minds cannot be perplexed or frightened but go on in fortune or misfortune at their own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm. There s a reason this novella has stood the test of time it is creepy and interesting as hell I think there s something very terrifying t 55 pages later and I m still convinced that Robert Louis Stevenson named his characters this way exclusively so he could fit in the line if he shall be Mr Hyde, I shall be Mr Seek and honestly that s iconic Quiet minds cannot be perplexed or frightened but go on in fortune or misfortune at their own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm. There s a reason this novella has stood the test of time it is creepy and interesting as hell I think there s something very terrifying to me about the idea of losing humanity and sanity, at first due to your own choices but later because of forces you cannot control Robert Louis Stevenson allegedly wrote this while on drugs, and you can definitely feel that experience in the book This is such a short book and I don t know quite what else to say, but guys I love Victorian horror it s so fucking weird and wild and all about Transgressing Social Norms and Being Subversive and this is the kind of shit I am HERE for sometime I ll write my term paper about how Victorian horror was a way for queer people, women, and mentally ill people to express their frustrations at Victorian society in a way that appealed to mass audiences, because I find that dynamic fascinating dangerous ideas book 2 Blog Twitter Instagram Youtube flag 216 likesLike see review View all 9 comments Jul 12, 2009 Stephen rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves easton press, 1800s, horror classic, classics, mad scientists, novellas, literature, signed first or limited edition, classics european, audiobook KUDOS, KUDOS and KUDOS to you, Mr Stevenson First, for bringing me happy than a Slip N Slide on a scorching summer day by providing Warner Bros with the inspiration for one of my favorite cartoons, Hyde and Go Tweet I mean who didn t love giant, cat eating Tweety Hyde Second, and seriously, when I tardily returned to your classic gothic novella as an adult, you once again red lined my joy meter with the strength and eloquence of your story craft You story is the gift that KUDOS, KUDOS and KUDOS to you, Mr Stevenson First, for bringing me happy than a Slip N Slide on a scorching summer day by providing Warner Bros with the inspiration for one of my favorite cartoons, Hyde and Go Tweet I mean who didn t love giant, cat eating Tweety Hyde Second, and seriously, when I tardily returned to your classic gothic novella as an adult, you once again red lined my joy meter with the strength and eloquence of your story craft You story is the gift that keeps on giving.In both structure and content, this narrative is a work of art From a technical perspective, it can be admired for its superb mingling of different literary devices More importantly for me at least , the story itself is a powerful depiction of some very important ideas about humanity and what we sometimes hide behind the veneer of civilization Structurally, the novella crams, stuffs and presses a complete, fully fleshed story in its scant 88 pages by using a brilliant combo of point of view changes, dialogue, flashback and epistolary components In lesser hands, the amount of information and story contained in this tale would have required a lot paper In addition to being a model of conciseness, the change in style, in my opinion, added to the enjoyment of the story by allowing the reader to be present during the narrative Content wise, Stevenson really knocks the cover off the ball Despite being written in 1886, this tale still stands as the quintessential fictional examination of the duality of man s nature and the very human struggle between the civilized and primal aspects of our beings The constrained, repressive society of the Victorian Period in which the story takes place provides the perfect back drop for the model of outward English propriety, Dr Henry Jekyll, to battle metaphorically and literally the darker, baser but still very human desires personified in the person of Edward Hyde What a perfect allegory between the face people wear in public and the one they take out only in private Hence it came about that I concealed my pleasures and that when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me, and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of life. Stevenson s prose is engaging and I found myself pulled into the narrative from the beginning I particularly enjoyed when Stevenson wrote of his characters reactions to being in the presence of Mr Hyde and the palpable, pervasive, but non pinpointable, sense of evil and dread that radiated from him For example There is something wrong with his appearance something displeasing, something downright detestable Hyde s features were the expression, and bore the stamp, of lower elements in my soul The last I think for, O poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan s signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend I was also impressed with Henry Jekyll s description of his growing realization that man not homogenous inside his own skin but a conglomerate of competing personalities and aspects With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck that man is not truly one, but truly two I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens Overall, this is one of those classics that lives up to its name and rightfully belongs among the highlights of gothic fiction I am very, very pleased that I decided to revisit this story as I found that I loved as an adult what I could only try to appreciate as a child 4.0 stars HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATION flag 169 likesLike see review View all 23 comments Feb 26, 2015 Sean Barrs the Bookdragon rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves folio society edition, 5 star reads, mystery crime and thrillers, classics, sci fi, darkness horror gothic Robert Louis Stevenson was a man who knew how to play his audience Utterson, the primary point of view character for this novel, is a classic Victorian gentleman he is honest, noble and trustworthy he is the last reputable acquaintance of down going men like Henry Jekyll So, by having a character who evokes the classic feelings of Victorian realism narrate the abnormal encounterings, it gives it credibility it gives it believability thus, the story is scarier because if a man such as Utter Robert Louis Stevenson was a man who knew how to play his audience Utterson, the primary point of view character for this novel, is a classic Victorian gentleman he is honest, noble and trustworthy he is the last reputable acquaintance of down going men like Henry Jekyll So, by having a character who evokes the classic feelings of Victorian realism narrate the abnormal encounterings, it gives it credibility it gives it believability thus, the story is scarier because if a man such as Utterson is seeing this strange case, then it must be real Indeed, this gothic novella was considered very scary at the time I think this was emphasised because Stevenson pushed the boundaries of the gothic genre One of the tenants of the style rests upon the inclusion of a doppelg nger Instead of using this classic idea Stevenson transgressed it with having his doppelg ngers relationship reside in the same character Jekyll Hyde is the same person, and at the same time one and another s counterpart I think this is a masterful technique because the relationship between the two is psychologically complex and fear inducing, than, for example, the relationship between Frankenstein and his Monster It breaks the boundaries of the normal role and establishes a doppelg nger relationship that is stronger than any others This all happened because one day a Victoria chemist decided to see if he could separate the two states of human nature The result was a successful disaster Utterson has to try and piece together the scraps of the strange situation He is perplexed at the idea of the paranormal because logic dictates that this shouldn t be happening, therefore, it isn t real, but only it is so, again, it becomes scary The incident at the window is demonstrative of this Utterson witnesses Jekyll s transgressive shift into Hyde and a shift between the doppelgangers The blood of the Victorian gentleman is frozen by what he beholds I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both I love the gothic genre and I love this novella I think so much can be taken from it because the number of interpretations that have been made of it are huge It is told in my favourite style of narration epistolary There are a number of narrators, including Jekyll himself Consequently, the interpretive value is increased significantly I ve spoken a lot about Utterson, but there is also the strong possibility of Jekyll being an unreliable narrator as he has deluded himself almost completely One could also compare the work to Stevenson s own life and his self imposed exile as he wrote this gothic master piece In addition to this, Hyde can be seen as the personification of having the so called exact physical characteristics of a criminal in the Victorian age, and the homosexual undertones are also very implicit in the text There is just so much going on in here The literary value of this is, of course, incredibly high But, it is also incredibly entertaining to read I ve written essays about this novella for university thus, I could praise this book all day and night This is, certainly, the best novella I ve read to date I had to buy a Folio Society edition of it, I just had to flag 145 likesLike see review View all 9 comments Oct 27, 2014 Fabian rated it liked it review of another edition The appearances superficiality motif appears as early on as the first sentence in this tense, tight, but ultimately convoluted smear of a novella Count on countenance for good sturdy bones in a story of detection yet Plus there are really nice framing devices on display here, a check mark always in my book, like the letters within letters narrative, a nifty exercise, which is mighty cool Here, my favorite sentence from the Robert Louis Stevenson classic Jekyll had tha The appearances superficiality motif appears as early on as the first sentence in this tense, tight, but ultimately convoluted smear of a novella Count on countenance for good sturdy bones in a story of detection yet Plus there are really nice framing devices on display here, a check mark always in my book, like the letters within letters narrative, a nifty exercise, which is mighty cool Here, my favorite sentence from the Robert Louis Stevenson classic Jekyll had than a father s interest Hyde had than a son s indifference 85 Super neat Yet And then there is the fact that the main protagonists become manifested once they are uttered into existence by the status quo, the pre turn of the century Londonfolk Rumor creates their reputations before the two, er one, ever make the center stage HoweverI must mention that I feel as though the actual occurrence, the solved crime, what s underneath all the whispy artifices of this rudimentary detective noir novel, is a homosexual relationship gone to extremes, to a level that s too literary Maybe that s a stretch Also, I LOVE that JEKYLL sounds like jackal, as in Devil Cute.ButThis is not worthy of the canon Bottom Line Cos the whole Dual Nature and Commingling of Good and Evil thing is overdone, stamped into the reader like some mantra that could be interpreted in many different ways and becomes, quite frankly, overly exhausted This ain t as kitschy, or pre kitschy nowhere near as I d foolishly predicted If you want something macabre AND brilliant, go to the French serial classic The Phantom of the Opera flag 140 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Mar 31, 2012 Ahmad Sharabiani rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves classic, gothic, mystery, 19th century, fantasy The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Robert Louis StevensonStrange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a gothic novella by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson first published in 1886 The work is also known as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, or simply Jekyll Hyde It is about a London lawyer named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde The novella s impact The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Robert Louis StevensonStrange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a gothic novella by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson first published in 1886 The work is also known as The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, or simply Jekyll Hyde It is about a London lawyer named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde The novella s impact is such that it has become a part of the language, with the very phrase Jekyll and Hyde coming to mean a person who is vastly different in moral character from one situation to the next 2012 1373 111 1376 240 9644220579 1886 flag 135 likesLike see review View 2 comments Oct 26, 2016 Hailey Hailey in Bookland rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves owned 4.5 Read for class flag 123 likesLike see review View all 5 comments Mar 26, 2015 Jeff rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves buddy reads, stuff they make you read in school What I learned reading Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde By Jeff1 Some things are better left unsaid Really Who knows how Hyde indulged himself Hookers Pirating Running an orphan sweat shop Booze Opium Ripping the Do Not Remove under Penalty of Law labels from mattresses 2 Never have a nosy lawyer as a best friend Who the hell hangs out with lawyers 3 My evil Hyde would not be a top hat wearing, monkey like Juggernaut Sorry, he would be Dean Martin esque, a la The Nutty Professor 4 What I learned reading Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde By Jeff1 Some things are better left unsaid Really Who knows how Hyde indulged himself Hookers Pirating Running an orphan sweat shop Booze Opium Ripping the Do Not Remove under Penalty of Law labels from mattresses 2 Never have a nosy lawyer as a best friend Who the hell hangs out with lawyers 3 My evil Hyde would not be a top hat wearing, monkey like Juggernaut Sorry, he would be Dean Martin esque, a la The Nutty Professor 4 How in need Victorian England was for body waxing and or Nair.5 As long as my evil twin was a different size stretchy spandex material for those embarrassing and untimely changes.6 This has no business being a musical An episode of Scooby Doo, sure I would have worked my way through the entire brothel, if it wasn t for you meddling kids Stage musical, no 7 Possible Hyde potion flavors Salted Caramel, Lime Mint, White Chocolate Almond, Tangerine Mango8 Evil housekeeper good, evil hideout attached to regular pad just stupid Note to self make Evil me smarter and even cunning.9 Some adaptations over the years In Abbot and Costello Meet Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Costello, playing Tubby, is transformed into a big mouse Huh In Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde, the movie poster warned The sexual transformation of a man into a woman will actually take place before your very eyes Acting Brilliant Thank you 10 At around one hundred pages, this book novella was the perfect length Any longer and Stevenson s leaden prose style would have transformed me into grumpy, whiney, sleepy reader flag 123 likesLike see review View all 34 comments Nov 15, 2012 J.G Keely rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves short story, horror, uk and ireland, reviewed After the overblown Frankenstein and the undercooked Dracula, it s pleasant to find that the language and pacing of the third great pillar of horror is so forceful and deliberate especially since I was disappointed by Stevenson s other big work, Treasure Island But then, this is a short story, and it s somewhat easier to carry off the shock, horror, and mystery over fewer pages instead of drawing it out like Shelley and Stoker into a grander moralizing tale.But Stevenson still manages to get After the overblown Frankenstein and the undercooked Dracula, it s pleasant to find that the language and pacing of the third great pillar of horror is so forceful and deliberate especially since I was disappointed by Stevenson s other big work, Treasure Island But then, this is a short story, and it s somewhat easier to carry off the shock, horror, and mystery over fewer pages instead of drawing it out like Shelley and Stoker into a grander moralizing tale.But Stevenson still manages to get in quite a bit of complexity, even in the short space As I was reading it, I found myself wishing I didn t already know the story that it hadn t been automatically transmitted to me by society because I wondered how much better it would be to go in not knowing the answer to the grand, central mystery, but instead being able to watch it unfold before me Much has been said about the dual nature of man , the good versus the evil sides, but what fascinated me about the book was that despite being drawn in such lines, it did not strike me as a tale of one side of man versus another Indeed, it is the virtuous side who seeks out a way to become destructive, showing that his virtuosity is a mere sham.Likewise, neither Jekyll nor Hyde seem to have any real motivation to be either good or evil , it is that they are victims of some disorder which compels them to be as they are that causal Victorian psychology which, in the end, robs anyone involved of premeditation for what they do Dracula kills to survive, Frankenstein does so because he is the product of the ultimate broken home and Hyde does it as a self destructive compulsion despite the fact that he loves life above all else, yet is unable to protect himself well enough to retain it.This is not the evil of Milton s Satan, or of Moriarty, who know precisely what they do and do it because of the way they see the world before them, but that of the phrenologist, who measures a man s head with calipers and declares him evil based upon the values so garnered, independent of any understanding, motivation, or reason.And yet this is not an unbelievable evil indeed, Stevenson uses it as an analysis of addiction and other self destructive behaviors, where the pure chemical rush of the thing becomes its own cause, despite the fact that the addict will tell you he wishes nothing than to be rid of it, to be normal again, never to have tasted the stuff in the first place It is a place a man might fall into through ignorance and carelessness, never realizing how hard it could be, in the end, to escape.And that s something we can all relate to, far than the sociopathy of Moriarty, which requires that you have complete understanding but just a completely different set of emotional reactions to the world around you It is much easier for most people to say that there is some part inside them that they do not like, that makes them uncomfortable, some thoughts and desires which rise unbidden from their brain, and which they must fight off And it is the fact that they are strong enough to need to be fought off that unsettles us and gives us pause, for we do not like to think that such incomprehensible forces might always be there, working, just beneath the surface, and which might come out not due to some dark desire or motivation, but due to simple, thoughtless error flag 112 likesLike see review View all 20 comments Hal Brodsky Don t forget HG Wells The Invisible Man No one seems to read it any, but it truly is special The best part is, you probably do not know the Don t forget HG Wells The Invisible Man No one seems to read it any, but it truly is special The best part is, you probably do not know the story Nov 09, 2018 06 10AM So a Great review, thank you Aug 29, 2019 03 48PM Apr 29, 2019 Greg Watson rated it it was amazing review of another edition December 2009Jekyll and Hyde is commonly evoked to describe someone with a split personality Stevenson s novel is about a dual physical and spiritual nature struggling for control of one person In this struggle, Dr Jekyll doesn t just assume a different personality, he actually becomes Mr Hyde.Presbyterian Pastor Tim Keller has a good, brief analysis of parts of the Jekyll and Hyde story in his book The Reason for God Keller pinpoints a key point in the story, noting that it s in a moment o December 2009Jekyll and Hyde is commonly evoked to describe someone with a split personality Stevenson s novel is about a dual physical and spiritual nature struggling for control of one person In this struggle, Dr Jekyll doesn t just assume a different personality, he actually becomes Mr Hyde.Presbyterian Pastor Tim Keller has a good, brief analysis of parts of the Jekyll and Hyde story in his book The Reason for God Keller pinpoints a key point in the story, noting that it s in a moment of vainglory that Dr Jekyll involuntary transforms into Mr Hyde This transformation occurs as Dr Jekyll sits on a bench in Regents Park, thinking about all the good he has been doing, and how much better man he was, despite Edward Hyde, than the great majority of people All this to say that Stevenson s novel goes far deeper than a psychoanalytic study of a split personality it s about a profound spiritual struggle of the evil and good nature within a person flag 103 likesLike see review View all 7 comments Feb 08, 2014 Tadiana Night Owl rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves classics, horror, literary stuff, oldies but goodies, gutenberg freebie, fantasy It seems like I ve been familiar with the good Dr Jekyll and the evil Mr Hyde all my life, but the thing that most struck me, once I finally got around to actually reading this classic, is other than their outward appearance how alike these two aspects of the same man actually are Dr Jekyll has always been aware of the duality in his character he admits to some apparently fairly serious youthful indiscretions, and even when he consciously puts his vices behind him for a time, he alway It seems like I ve been familiar with the good Dr Jekyll and the evil Mr Hyde all my life, but the thing that most struck me, once I finally got around to actually reading this classic, is other than their outward appearance how alike these two aspects of the same man actually are Dr Jekyll has always been aware of the duality in his character he admits to some apparently fairly serious youthful indiscretions, and even when he consciously puts his vices behind him for a time, he always feels the yearning to give into them again When he creates the potion that transforms him into Hyde, he s not leaving only his virtues with Jekyll and putting all his evil aspects into Hyde although I had now two characters as well as two appearances, one was wholly evil, and the other was still the old Henry Jekyll, that incongruous compound of whose reformation and improvement I had already learned to despair The movement was thus wholly toward the worse.So Henry Jekyll still has all of his original hidden vices, and Hyde seems to me to be just a way for him to let the evil side of himself loose without Jekyll thinks fear of repercussions But Hyde isn t purely evil either there seems to be of Jekyll s character in Hyde than the good doctor is willing to admit, or Hyde wouldn t always have been so anxious to turn himself back into Jekyll, like when he writes the frantic letter to his friend for help I think our doctor is a bit of an unreliable narrator.It s interesting to think about the symbolism of the names here the good doctor carries the name Je French for I kill, and the evil Hyde is the part of Jekyll himself that he was always trying to hide.Most of the other characters also seem to have their hidden vices There s a lot of discussion and symbolism in the book about dual natures the city itself, and even Jekyll s home, have a proper degenerate dichotomy, with good and bad co existing side by side Certainly this was a major issue in Victorian times, when people in society wanted to appear very proper, but there was some major hidden sleaziness and vice I m not sure, in the end, what the book is trying to say is the cure for this problem Repression doesn t appear to work very well, but at the same time, Jekyll s woes and eventual death come from his caving in to his evil desires, hidden or not Maybe there are no easy answers.Actor Richard Mansfield portrayed Jekyll and Hyde in a theater production in the 1880 s so well that he was suspected of being Jack the Ripper Buddy read with Jeff, Anne, Holly, Stepheny, Delee and Dustin A big thanks to Anne for hosting our party Sorry if we trashed your house flag 104 likesLike see review View all 28 comments Oct 31, 2014 Raeleen Lemay rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves classics, spooky scary, own IF ONLY the revelation halfway through this had been unknown to me before reading it, I probably would have enjoyed this book It was good, but knowing what the twist is can really bring a story down for me.This book is also very simple and to the point, which isn t always my favourite style of writing I would have enjoyed for the story to be drawn out, preferably with an addition of at least another hundred pages flag 92 likesLike see review View all 3 comments Apr 15, 2014 Bionic Jean rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves classics, mystery crime, read authors q t, kindle, 19th century ish, ghost horror supernatural Do you know what a Jekyll and Hyde character is Of course you do It is one of the descriptions, originally in a piece of literature, which has now become accepted in our vernacular And there are many renditions of the story, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and countless references to it in all aspects of life Quite an achievement for a slim Victorian volume written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, and published in 1886 Man is not truly one, but truly two So ass Do you know what a Jekyll and Hyde character is Of course you do It is one of the descriptions, originally in a piece of literature, which has now become accepted in our vernacular And there are many renditions of the story, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and countless references to it in all aspects of life Quite an achievement for a slim Victorian volume written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, and published in 1886 Man is not truly one, but truly two So asserts Dr Jekyll But we are slightly handicapped nowadays by knowing the crux of the plot beforehand Before this tale there seems to have been nothing similar, although there had been earlier tales in literature about doppelg ngers Robert Louis Stevenson had always been interested in the duality of human nature, and shown admiration for morally ambiguous heroes or anti heroes But the spark which produced this novel was ignited by a dream he had had His wife Fanny reported, In the small hours of one morning I was awakened by cries of horror from Louis Thinking he had a nightmare, I awakened him He said angrily, Why did you wake me I was dreaming a fine bogey tale I had awakened him at the first transformation scene The writing of the story itself is a gripping tale Stevenson wrote the original draft with feverish excitement, taking less than three days He then collapsed with a haemorrhage, and his wife edited the manuscript, as was her habit The story is that it was she who suggested to her husband that he should have written it as an allegory, rather than a story.On being left alone with his manuscript, Stevenson promptly burnt it to ashes, thus forcing himself to start again from scratch, and rewrite it in the form of an allegory It is unclear whether this is true, or myth, since there can be no evidence of a burnt manuscript However later biographers of Robert Louis Stevenson have claimed that he was probably on drugs such as cocaine when writing it He was certainly ill and confined to bed at the time.The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was an immediate success, and remains Stevenson s most popular work It is only recently however that his work has been thought to deserve critical attention The author himself took his writing lightly, shrugging his popularity off with a dismissive, Fiction is to grown men what play is to the child, and continuing to write his swashbuckling stories of romance and adventure what he called historical tushery The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was thus an unusual tale for him to write Perhaps its popularity at the time was partly due to its high moral tone Not only was it adapted for the stage, but was also said to be widely quoted in religious sermons With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck that man is not truly one, but truly two All human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil and Edward Hyde, alone, in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil One can see how ministers of the church would be tempted to use the story as a convenient illustration for descriptions of temptation, sin and depravity.From a modern point of view the style is dated, and almost archaic There is a lot of preamble and dissembling Of course this must have added to the mystery Yet since there is little mystery at all to a modern reader, it is difficult to judge The novel starts with a London lawyer named Gabriel John Utterson who is intrigued to be told stories of his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and also about some evil crimes committed by a man called Edward Hyde He himself witnesses Hyde going into Jekyll s house, describing Hyde as a troglodyte , or ugly animalistic creature As the story moves on, we learn that not only is Hyde primitive, but also immoral, taking a delight in his crimes He is not an animal, amoral and innocent, but a person Utterson sees as evil and depraved, full of rage and revelling in his vices view spoiler The two violent crimes which Hyde indulges in are both directed against the most vulnerable members of society a young child and a much loved old man hide spoiler The puzzle remains what could possibly be the link between the two very different men Yet is the morality of civilised people merely a veneer after all The story is set very firmly in its time, when the ideas of what was decent and upright behaviour was set, not fluid Yet even so, appearances and facades were often just an illusory surface, hiding a sordid truth A respectable man would sometimes prefer to look the other way and remain ignorant, I feel very strongly about putting questions it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgement You start a question, and it s like starting a stone You sit quietly on the top of a hill and away the stone goes, starting others and presently some bland old bird the last you would have thought of is knocked on the head in his own back garden, and the family have to change their name No, sir, I make it a rule of mine the it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask When Utterson suspects that view spoiler his friend might be being blackmailed, he makes no mention of it Neither does he speak out when he thinks Dr Jekyll might be sheltering Hyde from the police hide spoiler To a Victorian gentleman, his reputation would have been paramount The unwritten rule of the time, known to all respectable people, stated that one never betrayed a friend, whatever their secret This may seem hypocrisy to modern eyes, or it may seem loyalty.As the story moves on the relationship between the two is compounded, but it is not until the final chapters, which consist of two letters to be opened in the event of a death, that the horrific story unfolds This is a popular device of the time, but it lacks immediacy, and the story seems to finish unexpectedly, at the end of one letter, without any sort of conclusion The descriptions however are very powerful, As I looked there came, I thought a change he seemed to swell his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter The most racking pangs succeeded a grinding in the bones, deadly nausea, and a horror of the spirit that cannot be exceeded at the hour of birth or death Then these agonies began swiftly to subside, and I came to myself as if out of a great sickness There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably sweet I felt younger, lighter, happier in body within I was conscious of a heady recklessness, a current of disordered sensual images running like a millrace in my fancy, a solution of the bonds of obligation, an unknown but innocent freedom of the soul I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be wicked, tenfold wicked, sold a slave to my original evil and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted me like wine This was the shocking thing that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life And this again, that that insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life It is an interesting depiction by Stevenson, that Dr Jekyll could rarely bring himself to use the personal pronoun when talking about Hyde s most despicable crimes Indeed, the character makes the same observation himself, yet at first he had talked in the first person throughout.To a modern reader then, this is a story about a split personality, or what is technically called dissociative identity disorder But Stevenson also invites us to view it as a moral tale, an allegory, questioning the abstract notions of good and evil Do we all have a dark side Do we truly have both a tendency to evil and an inclination towards virtue within our natures If so, how do we decide which is uppermost Can we consciously control them at all And which, if either, might continue after death The author poses the question, leaving it to the reader to decide, although there are hints that he views us all as having a dual nature, The bargain might appear unequal but there was still another consideration in the scales for while Jekyll would suffer smartingly in the fires of abstinence, Hyde would be not even conscious of all that he had lost It is always interesting to read the original of a much loved tale This has flaws of construction, but is well worth a look even so.EDIT a few months later I ve been aware that this is probably worth a little than my default rating, if only because of its phenomenal influence on popular culture, and writing about this theme, since So I m altering my rating to a 4 stars, as it falls somewhere between the two, I think flag 96 likesLike see review View all 27 comments Aug 19, 2016 Manny rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves donalds are trumps, science fiction By day, the mild mannered Dr Jekyll mouths platitudes about trickledown economics in front of a teleprompter while vaguely apologizing By night, the demoniacal Mr Hyde stands in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoots people Will the US electorate realize what s happening before it s too late _____________________ view spoiler They didn t hide spoiler flag 95 likesLike see review View all 33 comments Jan 22, 2014 Delee rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves classics, buddy read, mystery british, reviewed, horror medium rare not too bloody, pantless group read, own A veeeeeeeery short buddy read with Buddy Loooooove, Too much Buddy Love aka I want to be called The Nutty Professor, I love everybody Buddy Love, What did I do to deserve this Buddy Love , Gimmie some Buddy Love.aaaaaand My brand new Buddy Love Whew Did I get everyone I am not a classic book reader I fall under the category that some snobbish readers would call a fluffy readera reader for entertainment purposes only Not a reader for intellectual growth The classics were read in m A veeeeeeeery short buddy read with Buddy Loooooove, Too much Buddy Love aka I want to be called The Nutty Professor, I love everybody Buddy Love, What did I do to deserve this Buddy Love , Gimmie some Buddy Love.aaaaaand My brand new Buddy Love Whew Did I get everyone I am not a classic book reader I fall under the category that some snobbish readers would call a fluffy readera reader for entertainment purposes only Not a reader for intellectual growth The classics were read in my high school and college years and I was soooooo burned out by the time I finished the ones I HAD to read I just wanted fuuuuuuuuuun in my spare timebut when I heard that my favorite Goodreaders were picking this one upd was also aware that this one was sooooooo itsy bitsyI knew I had to join in Maybe I could be smart and have fuuuuuuuuuuun at the same time.The sensible lawyer Mr Utterson listens as his long time friend Enfield tells a sinister tale.He speaks of a wicked figure named Mr Hyde who assaulted a young girl and then quickly disappeared and re appeared only to make payment to her family Mr Utterson has heard this name beforefor another of his close friends and clients Dr Jekyll, made a will that will leave his property to this same horrible man.Shortbut packs a punch I realllllllllllllly liked this and I have to stop avoiding some of these novels I have written off as too serious for me Highly recommended for anyone that has a couple of hours to spare flag 89 likesLike see review View all 54 comments Apr 17, 2017 Sarah rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves classics, 2017 reads, horror thriller, books that are than just books, wishlist, favourites, fiction, books i need to reread Man is not truly one, but truly two Dr Jekyll attains through his experience with being both himself and Mr Hyde that there are actually two sides to him He claims that people, as far as he can tell, are made up of two sides good and evil But is it really true Is a good and dignified person, good and dignified because that is what s he is supposed to be Because that is the way s he is expected to be Does everyone have a secret dark side that they desperately keep in their closet Does thi Man is not truly one, but truly two Dr Jekyll attains through his experience with being both himself and Mr Hyde that there are actually two sides to him He claims that people, as far as he can tell, are made up of two sides good and evil But is it really true Is a good and dignified person, good and dignified because that is what s he is supposed to be Because that is the way s he is expected to be Does everyone have a secret dark side that they desperately keep in their closet Does this side hide in the dark, lurks, and waits for the perfect opportunity to be unleashed What happens when this dark side along with its impulses is repressed Does it create some sort of duality two personalities that seem opposite and antagonistic Is the conflict between the two sides Man s burden till the last breath s he takes What happens when you dwell on a side and neglect the other Is a certain balance possible All human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil and Edward Hyde, alone, in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil I have been made to learn that the doom and burden of our life is bound forever on man s shoulders and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with unfamiliar and awful pressure You must suffer me to go my own dark way flag 84 likesLike see review View 2 comments Sep 26, 2016 Evgeny rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves horror The story is widely known and very influential It was retold and replayed countless number of times by practically everywhere and everybody, including one of the best cartoon series of all the time, Looney Tunes For this reason people writing blurbs for the book decided it is quite fine to take a lazy route and give spoiler right away At least in my opinion something revealed only in the last chapter should be considered a spoiler I am going to assume there are people who have no clue what th The story is widely known and very influential It was retold and replayed countless number of times by practically everywhere and everybody, including one of the best cartoon series of all the time, Looney Tunes For this reason people writing blurbs for the book decided it is quite fine to take a lazy route and give spoiler right away At least in my opinion something revealed only in the last chapter should be considered a spoiler I am going to assume there are people who have no clue what the book is about and only tell the very beginning without revealing the contents of the aforementioned last chapter Imagine a typical old fashioned respected Victorian doctor He lived a typical for his class life when his friends began noticing his mysterious connection to a highly disagreeable I am trying to use the appropriate for that time term man called Mr Hyde The first obvious conclusion was a blackmail it seems a good doctor led a fairly wild life when he was a youth Once again let me remind you that most probably his life was wild only in the eyes of his Victorian contemporaries So it seems Mr Hyde knew something about the doctor because the latter never failed to hush up the crazy adventures of the former The truth turned out to be much gruesome I would not qualify the book as horror as it is not scary It does have a great atmosphere though and a couple of scenes are quite spooky The writing style while somewhat aged is still quite good and makes an easy read Having said this I need to mention I was really bored by the end Why The tale has a clear message it was so clear I would not even talk about it to avoid spoilers for those rare individuals who do not know the story Anyhow, by the end I had a strong impression that the delivering of the message was a little heavy handed I am not trying to tell the author was driving it home with a hammer far from it He was using serious tool for this This made reading the last chapter quite a chore with the only saving grace being the overall length of the book it is fairly short This is the reason why I lowered my rating for otherwise classic horror story 3.5 stars rounded down flag 82 likesLike see review View all 20 comments Dec 01, 2017 Natalia Yaneva rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves in english Bulgarian review below If he be Mr Hyde , he had thought, I shall be Mr Seek.If Jekyll and Hyde was a painting, it would ve been Edvard Munch s The Scream If it was a mental illness, it would ve been dissociative identity disorder, not schizophrenia, as is the popular guess if there s than one of you inside your head I would say that the story can also be likened to a long dark tea time of the soul, because it would take you just that much to read i Bulgarian review below If he be Mr Hyde , he had thought, I shall be Mr Seek.If Jekyll and Hyde was a painting, it would ve been Edvard Munch s The Scream If it was a mental illness, it would ve been dissociative identity disorder, not schizophrenia, as is the popular guess if there s than one of you inside your head I would say that the story can also be likened to a long dark tea time of the soul, because it would take you just that much to read it Beware however, for you will think about it for a long time afterwards and it ll make your flesh creep.I suppose it can be argued that in each of us there s something we cannot fully explain It happens to be seen in a bad light , we jump out of our skin or we are out of our senses Thinking about it, we have a slight obsession for others to perceive us in our good half, or third, or however many sides we imagine that we have This is probably also related to the prehistoric fear of banishment from the community, which meant certain death due to the lack of mammoth meat for dinner or the roar of a predatory saber toothed cat instead of good morning The strain to appear normal than we actually are is one of the curses of mankind Sometimes the exertion of this exhausts us completely, and we even begin to wonder if there is such a thing as normality The answer, of course, is always no.In his gothic novel, Robert Louis Stevenson carries to excess the good Dr Jekyll s struggle with his inner demons, and thus the blood chilling Hyde appears What better metaphor of the guileful human nature than being both the protagonist and the antagonist of one s own life One would have thought that if you cut off the sprout of evil in yourself and throw it away like a weed, it would be some sort of an ending However, weeds have the annoying propensity to grow under all types of unfavorable conditions, unlike goodness, which, alas, requires quite special care and everlasting nourishment Mr Hyde, uprooted and then sprouting, left alone to his own devilish devices, slowly begins to choke his creator The natural course of everything is towards chaos Many efforts are needed to harness the chaos in one s soul Denial though only aggravates the situation.Mr Hyde is an allegory of the evil which smoulders in each of us The scientific exorcism practiced by Jekyll eloquently shows the catastrophic consequences when one isn t reconciled with all pieces of their own nature and is trying to be something they are not It also shows that if you try to trick the much needed equilibrium in nature, nothing good is in store for you I don t entirely agree with Sartre, who thinks hell is other people Hell is always in our own consciousness And everything that it shows us is just an illusion If he be Mr Hyde , he had thought, I shall be Mr Seek , flag 86 likesLike see review View 2 comments Apr 10, 2018 Lyn rated it liked it review of another edition Bruce Banner The Hulk, Lawrence Talbot The Wolfman, and Norman Bates are watching Stanley Kubrick s 1987 film Full Metal Jacket and Joker has just said to the visiting Colonel that his helmet decorations were meant to suggest something about the duality of man.Norman We all go a little mad sometimes.Bruce This makes me think of Robert Louis Stevenson s 1886 novella The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde I mean about the whole duality of man thing.Talbot I think that is a ubiquitou Bruce Banner The Hulk, Lawrence Talbot The Wolfman, and Norman Bates are watching Stanley Kubrick s 1987 film Full Metal Jacket and Joker has just said to the visiting Colonel that his helmet decorations were meant to suggest something about the duality of man.Norman We all go a little mad sometimes.Bruce This makes me think of Robert Louis Stevenson s 1886 novella The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde I mean about the whole duality of man thing.Talbot I think that is a ubiquitous element of much of fiction, especially in the fantasy or horror genres, that someone can be two people at once, or can change from a civilized man into a monster.Norman Stephen King observed this in his treatise on horror fiction Danse Macabre, that one of the basic tenants of horror, one of the fundamental templates for a horror story is the idea that we can cross a line and become a fiend.Talbot My own unique situation with lycanthropy is a study in this, as is my inner struggle about how enjoyable it is to become the wolf, to set aside the morals of society and be a beast Bruce But like Jekyll, the consequences of the beastly behavior becomes too overwhelming when we return to human I feel a tremendous responsibility to control the Hulk, to minimize the damage that he we I can cause I think that is part of what destroyed Jekyll I must control my anger, you wouldn t like me when I m angry.Norman This concept, this idea goes back to mythology, with the Roman god Janus and of the personification of transitions and duality, the idea that we represent opposing forces, divergent walkers on the same path My mother likes to say things like that anyway.Bruce Interestingly, and opposed to much of the adaptations of this story, Hyde was described as dwarfish and not bigger than Jekyll most modern interpretations of this story show him as a larger than life, hulking figure whereas Stevenson drew him as smaller.Norman Perhaps Stevenson was eliciting a Victorian ideal about decadence, depravity and the diminution of societal norms, being monstrous made him less of a man, he was dealing in metaphor.Talbot An intriguing story and a must read for fans of the horror genre as it represents a fundamental pattern in this context flag 78 likesLike see review View all 8 comments Jun 25, 2014 Lisa rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves 1001 books to read before you die I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both As so often, my students gave me food for thought after I carelessly summed up the idea behind Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde and the duality of humankind, moving between animal brutality and intellectual sophistication But that is not true Of course I thought the I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both As so often, my students gave me food for thought after I carelessly summed up the idea behind Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde and the duality of humankind, moving between animal brutality and intellectual sophistication But that is not true Of course I thought the next argument would be that people are not divided and that the story is exaggerated, and of course I was wrong People are not dual, they are multiple personalities, that idea is way to0 easy So the teacher in me stayed quiet for a moment and let the student and learner in me consider the piece of evidence presented to me by a learner turned teacher in front of me Then I nodded It s true, we are multiple, all of us, and we are much versatile in our metamorphosis from one personality to another than Stevenson captured in his famous story We don t even need to manipulate our organism to change we do it instantly when we face another human being In school, I am a certain person that completely disappears when I am a patient at a hospital, and my mother persona does not follow my body to the pub when I meet friends My daughter persona actually acts in a much younger way than my default persona sitting in a reading chair imagining to be a character in a fiction storyAnd it is not only behaviour Looks change too Watch people queueing in a supermarket, and compare them to themselves at a wedding Is it not a case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde So I revise my idea of Stevenson s story, without liking it any less, and claim it is a simplification of the crowd we all carry in our minds, the microcosm of thought we let loose on the macrocosm of other minds each day My Goodreader persona could stay forever in front of the screen, but the coffee devil inside is yelling something animalistic about an addiction he s forced upon the community of minds that my tired Wednesday morning body is hosting So we re off to the coffee machine flag 70 likesLike see review View all 9 comments Sep 05, 2016 James rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves 1 fiction, 4 written pre 20th century Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde written in 1886 by Robert Louis Stevenson So here s how naive I was years ago and keep in mind I was an English major who loved the classics I d read some short stories about Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde as a teenager, maybe saw some video or tv versions can t quite remember Sopho year in college, this is listed on the assigned syllabus for one of my courses And I m like I think there s a mistake Stevens Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde written in 1886 by Robert Louis Stevenson So here s how naive I was years ago and keep in mind I was an English major who loved the classics I d read some short stories about Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde as a teenager, maybe saw some video or tv versions can t quite remember Sopho year in college, this is listed on the assigned syllabus for one of my courses And I m like I think there s a mistake Stevenson wrote Treasure Island He didn t create this mystery about a strange man I couldn t separate that the author had different styles and stories I don t know what I was thinking maybe I had no sleep point being, this was a turning point in literature for me, where I realized how an author could truly write very different novels And both be great For me, this was why I loved reading all the time Drama Intrigue Mystery Suspense Crazy Unique Peculiar It was everything my boring life wasn t at the time I suspect most people don t realize this was a lengthy novel before it was a short work and a TV thing It s a must read Go Now About Me For those new to me or my reviews here s the scoop I read A LOT I write A LOT And now I blog A LOT First the book review goes on , and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at where you ll also find TV Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I ve visited all over the world And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who what when where and my pictures Leave a comment and let me know what you think Vote in the poll and ratings Thanks for stopping by flag 69 likesLike see review View 2 comments Oct 04, 2015 Apatt rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves classics I have become a monster I must find a place where I can hide That s it I shall call myself DUN DUN DUUUUN Mr Where I can The above is paraphrased from a Morecambe Wise Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde sketch, they don t often make me laugh, but this one is gold Not so much The Strange Case as the Overly Familiar Case The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of those stories that practically everybody knows so few people bother to read the original text The original Fr I have become a monster I must find a place where I can hide That s it I shall call myself DUN DUN DUUUUN Mr Where I can The above is paraphrased from a Morecambe Wise Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde sketch, they don t often make me laugh, but this one is gold Not so much The Strange Case as the Overly Familiar Case The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of those stories that practically everybody knows so few people bother to read the original text The original Frankenstein and Dracula are also often neglected by readers for the same reason This is a shame because these are great books and well worth reading, Frankenstein is particularly beautifully written.Clearly the inspiration for Dr Banner and Mr Hulk , The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is, first and foremost, a damn fine horror story If you ignore the fact that you already know all the plot points and just immerse yourself into Robert Louis Stevenson s wonderfully atmospheric setting and prose Imagine walking around a foggy London street in Victorian times, whistling some spooky tune, and suddenly DUN DUN DUUUUN Mr Hyde comes out of nowhere and whacks you on the head.The theme of the duality of human nature is not exactly vague since it takes on a such a physical manifestation However, Stevenson leaves you to draw your own conclusion of whether Jekyll s theory is valid The story is also an allegory and a cautionary tale for inebriation or getting wasted , and yielding to temptation in general Just one pint and you may find yourself whacking people in foggy London.Interestingly Dr Jekyll is not as good a guy as many people may assume The text clearly indicates that he is always up for a wild time, painting the town red, visiting houses of ill repute, and doing some serious SM Besides, no decent gentleman is going to deliberately and repeatedly take drugs that turn him into a psychopath.Anyway, do give The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde a read, it may be old hat, but it never goes out of fashion Try it on for size Art by MB CG._________________ Not to be confused with MS which is Marks Spencer, where you can be fairly sure of non mayhem.Notes Cool quote Will you be wise will you be guided will you suffer me to take this glass in my hand and to go forth from your house without further parley or has the greed of curiosity too much command of you There are several audiobook versions of this book on Librivox, I chose the one read by David Barnes, as he sounds suitably English The narration is a little bit of a monotone, but nice and clearly read, and it s free so I can t complain Thank you Mr Barnes Are you reading this review in October Definitely add it to your Halloween list If you like Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde check out The Bottle Imp by the same author It is an awesome supernatural short story flag 67 likesLike see review View all 21 comments Jul 07, 2019 SARA A URIBE16 rated it it was amazing review of another edition Review in English and in SpanishThis story is full of suspense, quite intriguing I hope that those who have decided to read this great classic will also take the time to read even about its author and how this novel arises for him and for the world we know today The most interesting things for me is the game of the duality of human consciousness something that can be seen in Greek and Roman mythology, but in this time still full of dark light, declaring that we are a combination of black Review in English and in SpanishThis story is full of suspense, quite intriguing I hope that those who have decided to read this great classic will also take the time to read even about its author and how this novel arises for him and for the world we know today The most interesting things for me is the game of the duality of human consciousness something that can be seen in Greek and Roman mythology, but in this time still full of dark light, declaring that we are a combination of black and white and not one or the other Love this story and I recommend it too.Esta historia esta llena de suspenso, bastante intrigante Espero a su vez que los que hallan decidi leer este gran cl sico se tomen el tiempo de leer aun mas de su autor y como surge esta novel para el y para el mundo que hoy conocemos De las cosas mas interesantes para mi es el juego de la dualidad de la conciencia humana algo que se puede evidenciar en la mitolog a griega y romana, pero que atreves del tiempo sigue siendo la misma llena de claros oscuros, declarando que somos una combinaci n entre lo negro y lo blanco y no lo uno u lo otro Ame esta historia y la recomiendo demasiado flag 68 likesLike see review Jun 26, 2017 Robin rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves english, gothic, literature, literary fiction, 2017, horror, 1001 before you die, novella My impetus for reading this classic 1886 novella was seeing an interview with Donna Tartt in which she discusses writing The Goldfinch She says that she read Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde during her formative years and that there s something of it in every book I ve ever written Well, since I adore every book Ms Tartt has ever written, it was high time I read this.I love the creeptastic gothic stories from this time period Frankenstein, Dracula, anything by Poe There s something dank and dingy i My impetus for reading this classic 1886 novella was seeing an interview with Donna Tartt in which she discusses writing The Goldfinch She says that she read Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde during her formative years and that there s something of it in every book I ve ever written Well, since I adore every book Ms Tartt has ever written, it was high time I read this.I love the creeptastic gothic stories from this time period Frankenstein, Dracula, anything by Poe There s something dank and dingy in those pages that makes the skin turn clammy It must have been highly original for the time, and made me realise that Stevenson s story has influenced and inspired many writers through the years, not just Tartt Hello, Fight Club The execution of this book wasn t necessarily my cup of tea a few written post mortem confessions don t exactly bring horror to life BUT the ideas behind this book are what really interest me Duplicity, shame, alienation, and morality, to name a few It is chilling to acknowledge we all have a set of polar twins that are continuously struggling in order to both satisfy self and present well in society That each person has their own Hyde scratching in the basement is everyone s dirty little secret flag 64 likesLike see review View all 16 comments Mar 25, 2013 Bradley rated it really liked it review of another edition Shelves horror, satire, 2016 shelf, fantasy I had hoped that a re read would have increased my appreciation of this old, albeit classic, tale, but alas, I still just find it okay I can t complain about the style because I ve read a lot of Stevenson s contemporaries I can t complain that it s not fantastic or gruesome enough, because it does have a certain low level miasma of hysteria that works fine as a thriller.What I can and want to complain about is something that has annoyed me about these people from day one The insistence th I had hoped that a re read would have increased my appreciation of this old, albeit classic, tale, but alas, I still just find it okay I can t complain about the style because I ve read a lot of Stevenson s contemporaries I can t complain that it s not fantastic or gruesome enough, because it does have a certain low level miasma of hysteria that works fine as a thriller.What I can and want to complain about is something that has annoyed me about these people from day one The insistence that Evil is Written in People s Ugliness I mean, jeeze, way to play up that prejudice, Stevenson I mean, sure, the guy eventually got around to murdering someone, but for the most part, he was just letting down his hair, masturbating, visiting prostitutes and spitting on little old church ladies Not in any particular order, mind you, and probably not all at the same time.This is a GUILTY PLEASURE novel of good ole repressed England A Oh my goodness I m being so naughty aren t I a bad boy and wouldn t it be great if I could get away with this without ANY repercussions novel Just because it upholds the majority moralistic lip service in terms of evil getting its just deserts doesn t mean that the book didn t also represent a real and true undercurrent of rebellion.In fact, I m sure it was seen and gloated over for just that reason Hyde may be despicable, but he s also a rock n roller, a biker dude, and Trump He just wants to see the world burn because the world has burned him.I can understand the popularity of this tale I enjoyed it on both reads, too.BUT, I don t have to appreciate the pandering to the lowest prejudices of the time flag 62 likesLike see review View all 13 comments Oct 20, 2017 classic reverie rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves robert louis stevenson, book made to movies i have seen, scottish writer, old time radio reference, 1800 Even though I have known about Jekyll and Hyde ever since I was a kid, and have seen Spencer Tracy in the 1941 film and have heard radio versions of this story and almost everyone knows it, I found the book enlightening into Stevenson s desire to show the duel personality of the two but even interesting is the acquiesce of Jekyll to the actions of Hyde with a kind of glee at first Even after Hyde becomes fiendish, Jekyll is not condoning but gives allowances to his behavior In t Even though I have known about Jekyll and Hyde ever since I was a kid, and have seen Spencer Tracy in the 1941 film and have heard radio versions of this story and almost everyone knows it, I found the book enlightening into Stevenson s desire to show the duel personality of the two but even interesting is the acquiesce of Jekyll to the actions of Hyde with a kind of glee at first Even after Hyde becomes fiendish, Jekyll is not condoning but gives allowances to his behavior In the end the fear Jekyll has with losing himself completely makes him hope for the destruction of the monster In the movie and radio version, the main character in telling of the story is Jekyll but in the book it is his two friends Also in the movie Jekyll is young is engaged to Lana Turner and has Ingrid Bergman for Hyde to abuse, in the book no romance or lust is noted When this book first was published it was all new to the public and I bet the majority were shocked about the transformation which is old hat to us now but Stevenson is genius in bringing out a look at human nature and how far does one want to sink into the depths of miasma I did not read this edition but a collection of his works.Radio versionhttps oldtimeradiodownloadsAnother radio version with 52 12 minute episodeshttps oldtimeradiodownloads I finished listening to the radio version with 52 episodes and found it a well done radio series from 1943 I started to listen to the same producer s Frankenstein version which is about 12 episodes but that version not enjoyable but felt forced In Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, they expounded on Hyde s evil deeds and Jekyll s relationship with others I had trouble with the sympathy given to Jekyll after his friends find out that he is the monster but have concern for his death then all the others he killed At the beginning, they showed his evil side without that ghastly potion They started to separate the two men in good evil which really Jekyll was not all good, so this brings the importance of having an evil side unleashed in ourselves in a normal range but Hyde Jekyll are one person so this person in his youth who had evil in him but now a saint That makes it ring less true flag 58 likesLike see review View all 19 comments Feb 15, 2017 Paul Bryant rated it liked it review of another edition Shelves novels This 70 page novelette is a load of old cobblers but very elegantly expressed cobblers The main idea is that everyone has a bad side and a good side Man is not truly one, but truly twoAnd hey, maybe for all I know, says Dr J I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens Got that, a mere polity So I think he s thinking of something like multiple personalities or sumpin Now Dr J, being an upstanding wealthy in This 70 page novelette is a load of old cobblers but very elegantly expressed cobblers The main idea is that everyone has a bad side and a good side Man is not truly one, but truly twoAnd hey, maybe for all I know, says Dr J I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens Got that, a mere polity So I think he s thinking of something like multiple personalities or sumpin Now Dr J, being an upstanding wealthy individual, still and all, he has a bad side It s not made explicit, this being 1886, what that consists of, but we might possibly imagine it could be smoking opium, or taking cocaine, like Sherlock did but he never classed that as a vice or maybe visiting prostitutes of one or another sex, some of whom would surely be way under the age of consent, but that is pure speculation Could be Dr Jeckyll s bad side consisted of coughing during church services or not raising his top hat to a legless veteran We don t know, we re not told, so our imaginations can run riot So Dr J thinks it s uncomfortable for the good and the bad side of a person to co habit that in the agonized womb of consciousness these polar twins should be continuously struggling as he puts it He therefore invents a Magic Potion to enable them to separate Here s where the total cobblers comes in I not only recognized my natural body for the mere aura and effulgence of certain of the powers that made up my spirit, but managed to compound a drug by which those powers should be dethroned from their supremacy, and a second form and countenance substituted, none the less natural to me because they were the expression, and bore the stamp, of lower elements in my soul If anyone can translate that hifalutin mumbo jumbo into English please let me know I would say that Dr J has a rather over refined mode of expression at the best of times this is him saying that all his servants were asleep The inmates of my house were locked in the most rigorous hours of slumberAnyway, once Dr J had drunk of the potion and become the shrunken, hideous Mr H, he gets to go wild But specifics are still hard to come by The pleasures which I made haste to seek in my disguise were undignified I would scarce use a harder term But in the hands of Edward Hyde, they soon began to turn towards the monstrous Well, that s all you get The only actual crimes we hear about are a motiveless street murder and a strange incident where he knocks a kid over in the street and tramples over her body She isn t injured, but a posse of angry citizens immediately forms and he is cornered and coughs up the sum of 100 in compensation The internet tells me that this represents 11,500 in today s money, which equals around 14,300 Wow, that s a lotta dough for not looking where you re going But anyways, what is the point of all this Dr J is not trying to suppress his bad side, quite the reverse, he s liberating it His potion makes it easier to function You might think that he d want to invent a potion to completely eradicate his bad side, but no, it seems the idea is simply to continue to do bad things but be less bothered by them the next day Really doesn t make a whole lot of sense I mean, was Dr J s ideal John Wayne Gacy He seemed to be able to effortlessly combine the good side successful builder, children s entertainer as Pogo the Clown and the bad side slaughterer of 33 teenaged boys Didn t bother him at all, until he was arrested I guess this novel is an expression of Victorian male guilt the men wanted to be able to do as they pleased, but if they were middle class, were hemmed in every which way by strict codes of conduct Four years later in 1890 Oscar Wilde published The Portrait of Dorian Gray which also explored the idea of being able to do anything without consequences Another odd thing I found in this little novel was that a middle aged man living alone in central London would need a whole gaggle of servants headed up by a butler to get by And that would be considered normal Unless you re a Saudi billionaire, times have really changed flag 50 likesLike see review View all 12 comments Aug 15, 2014 Lotte rated it it was amazing review of another edition Shelves ed penguin english library, o assigned reading, t victorian era, 2014 read, a classics, ge gothic horror, 2014 favourites, c 19th century This book was the start of my on going love story with gothic fiction Definitely one of my favorite classics in one of my favorite genres I highly recommend this flag 49 likesLike see review View all 3 comments previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next new topicDiscuss This Book topics posts views last activity Catching up on Cl Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde No Spoilers 8 94 Jun 08, 2019 11 17PM Bookworm Bitches February 2019 The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 4 26 Feb 25, 2019 04 40AM EVERYONE Has Read The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde SPOILERS 26 121 Dec 31, 2018 12 18AM EVERYONE Has Read The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Pre Read 13 107 Dec 17, 2018 01 31AM LHS_Saucey Kids Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 11 9 Nov 26, 2018 12 37PM More topics Share Recommend It Stats Recent Status Updates Readers also enjoyed Books by Robert Louis Stevenson More Trivia About The Strange Case 35 trivia questions 1 quiz More quizzes trivia Quotes from Quiet minds cannot be perplexed or frightened but go on in fortune or misfortune at their own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm 400 likes If he be Mr Hyde he had thought, I shall be Mr Seek 336 likes More quotes renderRatingGraph 82646, 126953, 94392, 20005, 4261 if rating_details rating_detailssert top rating_graph Company About us Careers Terms Privacy Help Work with us Authors Advertise Authors ads blog API Connect 2019 , Inc Mobile version

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    • ↠ Lo strano caso del Dottor Jeckyll e Mister Hyde || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Robert Louis Stevenson
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