The Cézanne Chase

The C zanne Chase The smoking briefcase was found in London s National Gallery near a rapidly disintegrating self portrait by C zanne The method of destruction Acid most obviously The motive That s up to Inspector Jac

  • Title: The Cézanne Chase
  • Author: Thomas Swan
  • ISBN: 9780451409836
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Paperback
  • The smoking briefcase was found in London s National Gallery near a rapidly disintegrating self portrait by C zanne The method of destruction Acid, most obviously The motive That s up to Inspector Jack Oxby to find out.Things just get messier when a C zanne in an eccentric businessman s private collection meets the same fate and a curator meets an untimely end Is someThe smoking briefcase was found in London s National Gallery near a rapidly disintegrating self portrait by C zanne The method of destruction Acid, most obviously The motive That s up to Inspector Jack Oxby to find out.Things just get messier when a C zanne in an eccentric businessman s private collection meets the same fate and a curator meets an untimely end Is someone planning to deface all twenty six C zanne self portraits Oxby s stumped until the worst thing he could ever imagine becomes a very real possibility

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      Posted by:Thomas Swan
      Published :2019-06-06T17:23:37+00:00

    About "Thomas Swan"

    1. Thomas Swan

      THOMAS SWAN is a past president of the Mystery Writers of America, New York Chapter Now a full time writer, he was an ad agency vice president, a senior advertising executive with American Express, a copywriter, and a television producer He lives in Short Hills, New Jersey.Series Inspector Jack Oxby

    953 thoughts on “The Cézanne Chase”

    1. Paul Cezanne (1839-1906), a French Impressionist, painted some twenty-six self-portraits in his lifetime. The portraits range from showing a "fiery theatrical self-interpretation of his youth a shrunken and timid middle-aged man." Most of these paintings are in prominent museums.Thomas Swan tells us a tale of the events leading to a 150-year birthday celebration and retrospective of Cezannne's works to take place in January 1989 in Aix-de-Provence, the artist's birthplace. The events concern the [...]



    2. This is a wonderfully complex story with enjoyable characters. There is good insight into both good and bad guys. This is a well researched story involving the Paul Cezanne self portraits. I recommend this story to any reader who enjoys a cerebral protagonist. It is streamlined and well written without a lot of adverbs or excessively descriptive language. Thomas Swan ably allows his readers to know what his characters are thinking. I plan to read the remaining 2 novels in this series. That said, [...]


    3. Wish this book had more about the painter and was less a detective story only using the portrait of the artist like a coveted piece of bling in a jewelry heist. A confusing number of characters, major and minor, all overly described in detail, as were all the many locations in which the events take place. A somewhat tedious read. Sorry.


    4. Read this for my mystery book club. While I didn't enjoy the violence, I was fascinated by the peek into the world of high-priced art. I didn't know about the fact that big museums have registrars to check works in and out of the museum. How a painting can be replicated was pretty interesting too. Swan has a couple other art-related mysteries, and I'll look for them.



    5. Good story but choppy.Hard to keep track of the good guys character to relate to.Cezanne self portraits are destroyed.


    6. I didn't finish this book. The premise of the story was interesting but the story was hard to follow and the level of detail bogged down the story rather than enriching the story.


    7. Nothing creative or interesting here: contrived, who-cares, stick-man characters with phony emotions and a slip-shod plot with all the familiar tropes.



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