The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association

The Rebel League The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association The wildest seven years in the history of hockeyThe Rebel League celebrates the good the bad and the ugly of the fabled WHA It is filled with hilarious anecdotes behind the scenes dealing and simp

  • Title: The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association
  • Author: Ed Willes
  • ISBN: 9780771089497
  • Page: 474
  • Format: Paperback
  • The wildest seven years in the history of hockeyThe Rebel League celebrates the good, the bad, and the ugly of the fabled WHA It is filled with hilarious anecdotes, behind the scenes dealing, and simply great hockey It tells the story of Bobby Hull s astonishing million dollar signing, which helped launch the league, and how he lost his toupee in an on ice scrap.It explaThe wildest seven years in the history of hockeyThe Rebel League celebrates the good, the bad, and the ugly of the fabled WHA It is filled with hilarious anecdotes, behind the scenes dealing, and simply great hockey It tells the story of Bobby Hull s astonishing million dollar signing, which helped launch the league, and how he lost his toupee in an on ice scrap.It explains how a team of naked Birmingham Bulls ended up in an arena concourse spoiling for a brawl How the Oilers had to smuggle fugitive forward Frankie Seldom Beaton out of their dressing room in an equipment bag And how Mark Howe sometimes forgot not to yell Dad when he called for his teammate father, Gordie, to pass There s the making of Slap Shot, that classic of modern cinema, and the making of the virtuoso line of Hull, Anders Hedberg, and Ulf Nilsson.It began as the moneymaking scheme of two California lawyers They didn t know much about hockey, but they sure knew how to shake things up The upstart WHA introduced to the world 27 new hockey franchises, a trail of bounced cheques, fractious lawsuits, and folded teams It introduced the crackpots, goons, and crazies that are so well remembered as the league s bizarre legacy.But the hit and miss league was much than a travelling circus of the weird and wonderful It was the vanguard that drove hockey into the modern age It ended the NHL s monopoly, freed players from the reserve clause, ushered in the 18 year old draft, moved the game into the Sun Belt, and put European players on the ice in numbers previously unimagined.The rebel league of the WHA gave shining stars their big league debut and others their swan song, and provided high octane fuel for some spectacular flameouts By the end of its seven years, there were just six teams left standing, four of which the Winnipeg Jets, Quebec Nordiques, Edmonton Oilers, and Hartford Whalers would wind up in the expanded NHL.From the Hardcover edition.

    • Ï The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association || ☆ PDF Read by î Ed Willes
      474 Ed Willes
    • thumbnail Title: Ï The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association || ☆ PDF Read by î Ed Willes
      Posted by:Ed Willes
      Published :2020-04-23T18:44:14+00:00

    About "Ed Willes"

    1. Ed Willes

      Sports columnist Ed Willes was born in Ottawa in 1955 Growing up, he moved across the country living in Ottawa, Montreal, Regina, Chilliwack, Toronto, Kingston, and Victoria He remained in Ottawa to complete his third year of journalism BA at Carleton, but, alas, never obtained his degree.Willes first newspaper posting was for the Medicine Hat News in 1982 when he covered the WHL Tigers, minor league Blue Jays, rodeo, and curling than he cares to remember.In 1996, Willes moved to Regina where he reported on the WHL Pats and Saskatchewan Roughriders He was working on a feature about a woman darts thrower when he was offered a columnist job at the Winnipeg Sun.In Winnipeg, he spent two years as the General Columnist before moving on and becoming the Jets beat writer and hockey columnist This stint led him to cover the tragic demise of the Jets while he also took on the role of the first beat writer for the IHL Manitoba Moose.After Winnipeg, Willes spent a year as a freelance writer in Montreal appearing regularly in the New York Times.Willes was finally drafted to The Province in the fall of 1998.Aside from his extensive writing career, Willes boasts a single digit handicap in golf, an encyclopedic knowledge of pre 1982 pop music and an inexplicable fascination with movies and popular culture as a whole.

    886 thoughts on “The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association”

    1. 6/10/16: Like Bobby Hull, Gordie Howe was one of those larger-than-life players that put the WHA on the map. He came to play next to his sons. And it was there his legend grew far greater.This book tells all those stories and more in beautiful detail. He was one of the greatest hockey players to ever play this game. RIP Mr. Hockey.Book Review:As far as writing goes for a historical event within hockey, I thought this book was first rate in how engaging and witty it was in re-telling the rise, an [...]


    2. As the NHL tries to revive interest following a lock out and lacking a contract with a significant television network, this isn't the first time there was an effort to shake up the world of professional hockey. Taking cues from the American Football League and the American Basketball Association, the World Hockey Association was born. The Rebel League, by Ed Willes, makes a worthy but not always successful effort to document the history of the WHA.[return][return]Although in existence only from [...]


    3. The Rebel League surprised me a bit. I was concerned it would be more of a "surface" story. Not really getting into details of the 7-year venture that was the WHA. It turned out to be a very well-written, detailed story.Sure, there are the must-haves like Gordie Howe and his kids, Bobby Hull, Wayne Gretzky, the Slap Shot inspiration, the goonery. But this had more.Details, details, details. Lots of interviews - and from a very diverse bunch. That was a big part of the enjoyment. Recognizing name [...]


    4. I was born in Edmonton at the tail end of the 1970s, so I always had a general awareness of the World Hockey Association, but I didn't really know much about it beyond a bunch of the teams ended up in the NHL, and that Gordie Howe played on the same team with his kids at one point. This book was clearly an education, then. The WHA story is an interesting one - it was started by people who seemed to not know much about hockey or business, and kept itself together with little more than duct tape a [...]


    5. This is the best hockey book you've never heard of. The book chronicles the good, the bad, and the ugly of the WHA, and there was plenty of bad and ugly to go around. The stories that filtered out of the wild and crazy backwoods league went on to inspire just about everything in SlapShot. Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction and this holds true here.


    6. Most enjoyable hockey book I have ever read--and I've read quite a few of them. Does for the World Hockey Association what Terry Pluto's LOOSE BALL did for the American Basketball Association. And once more, that is saying a lot.If you love hockey, or if you love the business of sports, if you remember the 70s--heck, if you ever rented "Slapshot," you should read this book.


    7. Hilarious. A decent history of the rise and fall, and the WHA's legacy, but mostly a collection of great anecdotes involving some pretty wacky characters. Willes tries a bit too hard to be the deadpan raconteur at times, but the tales themselves are amusing. A fun read, especially if you're a hockey fan.


    8. A great history of the World Hockey Association, warts and all. But the league forced the NHL into modern age, and should be fondly remembered for that. A non hockey fan would enjoy this book, as well as true hockey fans.


    9. This book exceeded my expectations by a great deal! Sports books, all too often, disappoint but this book is welcome exception. Willes has a great sense of humour and his approach in telling the story through the people involved makes for a wonderful, nostalgic experience.


    10. funny, well-researched and interviewed and attributed, and just everything is so good about this book. The names and such got a bit jumbled up in my head so I had to keep going back and reminding myself of who was who, but other than that this is such an entertaining, enlightening read.


    11. A funny and engaging read about the World Hockey Association from it's formation to it's eventual merging with the NHL.


    12. Loved this book grew up with the WHA Jets, a lot of the stuff I knew, some I didn't. A must read especially for WHA fans & all hockey fans who didn't get to see them play.


    13. Really enjoyed the stories of hockey in the 70s, definitely a bygone era. For as many flaws as the WHA had, they changed the sport forever.



    14. fascinating insight into the world of hockey in the 70's, and written in a way that's delightfully entertaining


    15. The 70s were an interesting decade for sports. You had a number of upstart leagues out there, challenging the existing status quo, fighting for more pieces of the pie that was and would continue to be an huge part of our culture. The AFL, the ABA, and the WHA were all upstart leagues, flying by the seat of their pants, and eventually merged with their bigger competitors, but all made their sports better.Perhaps you've seen Slapshot, that hockey movie about that blue collar, lunchpail hockey team [...]


    16. I liked the book and it is informative, but Marek had me hyped about it so much it couldn't reach my expectations.Plently of weird stories to check out, so if you are a bonafide hockey nerd it's a must. However, as someone who didn't grow up around hockey culture and only came to it after the last lockout, it is not easy to forge an emotional connection to the story told. Especially not-so-big stars that are brought in the lime light are people I hear about for the first time where I take n the [...]


    17. Hard to believe some of the things in this book actually happened. Comical and sad at the same time what some of those guys went through. Amazing that it was considered a professional league at all when you learn about some of the behind the scenes shenannigans that actually took place. I enjoyed it tremendously. I still have a bunch of WHA trading cards and old wax wrappers that they came in back in the day.



    18. A lot of good information about a very rough league. A few troubling parts, but a good recounting of the WHA.


    19. Ed Willes didn't have it easy trying to recreate a readable history of a sports league that didn't have the best system for keeping track of, well, anything. What we're left with is as much oral history as it is a wandering narrative about the World Hockey Association. However, Willes does manage to turn anecdotes and rivalry into compelling nonfiction. This isn't the type of straight forward narrative that one would expect, but then, the WHA was far from a straightforward organization. Over the [...]


    20. I was late to loving hockey. And that has everything to do with the fact that I grew up in Florida in the 80's. There was simply football season and baseball season. After my first Lightning game in the mid 00's, I was sold. The game is amazing. So, I try to learn as much as I can, to better appreciate and enjoy the game. I may not be able to recite hockey lore as well as my domestic brand of sports history, but it isn't for a lack of trying. And that's where this book comes in. I was vaguely fa [...]


    21. The book is filled with stories and stats from the WHA from the Lazarus-like rise of Gordie Howe to the mercurial career of such characters as Derek Sanderson and Bill Goldthorpe to the making of future superstars like Wayne Gretzky. At times the details seem thin, but the author clearly states at the outset that most of the details must be drawn from those who were there, 20 years prior to writing. At times the writing is a bit circular, like a newspaper article that includes the main points in [...]


    22. Awesomely told story of the WHA, long hidden by the NHL's refusal to believe another league could be as good. Very entertainingly written, I wish Willes would write more hockey books. Got me hooked on the WHA. Also worth watching is the 74 USSR/Russia vs Team Canada WHA series on DVD to see some NHL greats like Bobby Hull & Gordie Howe, plus Cheevers, the Nordiques' flying Frenchmen, etc. Great exciting hockey, even though we lost this one.


    23. The only book that covers the complete history of the World Hockey Association, which existed from 1972-1979 as a competitor to the NHL. Though full of anecdotes from former players and executives associated with the league, Willes also manages to detail the origins, activities and demise of the WHA.


    24. The only book that covers the complete history of the World Hockey Association, which existed from 1972-1979 as a competitor to the NHL. Though full of anecdotes from former players and executives associated with the league, Willes also manages to detail the origins, activities and demise of the WHA.


    25. I was hoping this would be more anecdotal/entertaining behind-the-scenes type book but it was mostly a pretty dry, straightforward reciting of the facts. (The idea for the league, who bought what teams for how much money, how they signed this and that player, etc.) Thumbs up for hockey nerdage, thumbs down for laughs.


    26. The WHA was a great, 70s-style crazy hockey league the likes of which we'll never see again. Rock 'em, sock em, and not the pedantic, cloying "no hit" hockey that we are subjected to today. This is an excellent recap of a lost era.


    27. A really interesting look at the WHA and the eventual absorption into the NHL. It was history that I was unfamiliar with, so learning more about the wrapping of the WHA into the NHL was a great area to expand my knowledge in with this book.


    28. I'd hoped this would be like "Loose Balls," the oral history of the American Basketball Association. While it dealt with a similar subject, the presentation was lacking.


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